Have to undergo an hallux valgus correction operation. What should I expect from the surgery?

There are . Literally over a hundred different bunion surguries.....you need to pick a doctor you feel comfortable with, they will take xrays evaluate your foot and explain to you your options.

Related Questions

What do I need to know about undergoing a hallux valgus correction operation?

HalluxValgus Surgery. Depending on the degree of hallux valgus there are many different types of surgery that may be appropriate for you. You may have a screw inserted in the bone and you may be able to walk on the foot the day of the surgery. You need to be evaluated by a podiatric surgeon to determine the appropriate procedure for your foot. Newer surgical techniques create much less pain than in years past. Read more...
See below. There are many different procedures so ask your surgeon to discuss the one chosen for you. Read more...
Bunions. Bunions or hallux abducto valgus deformities are found very often today in both males and females. There is a genetic component to getting them too. Bunions are treated both conservatively and surgically. Some conservative treatments include injections and custom devices. If these don't help then a surgical solution is recommended. See your podiatrist for further guidance. Read more...
Few males require su. Few males require surgery as shoe styles can accommodate the bunion. New othopaedic procedures have a greater chance of patient satisfaction. Primary goal is pain free status-not 4" narrow toed shoes. Read more...
Bunion surgery. Unfortunately, there are no braces or exercises to get rid of a bunion. If you elect to have it surgically removed, there are several ways your surgeon could go about it. Depending on the angle of your bones (you'll need an x-ray), there are many different procedures to choose from to correct your foot. The more aggressive procedures may require crutches and a boot afterward for several weeks. Read more...
Bunion. X-rays will determine what type of procedure is chosen for you. There are many different procedures and your surgeon will explain what is best for you and possible complications. Read more...
Consult with surgeon. Risks of any surgery include possible: pain swelling, numbness, infection, reaction to medication, hardware failure, blood clot, alteration of gait, joint stiffness, delayed healing, non healing, scar overgrowth, and possible need for further future medical or surgical intervention. Consult with your surgeon on the exact type of procedure and what to expect for that particular procedure. Read more...

How long do I ask off if I have to undergo for an hallux valgus correction operation.?

Talk to your Surgeon. These are the kinds of questions that should be addressed with your operating surgeon pre-operatively because the answer can vary widely depending on the type of procedure planned. Read more...
Depends on procedure. This is an important question to ask your doctor. Recover depends on the type of procedure. Some ways of fixing hallux valgus will allow you to walk on it right away and others may require 6 weeks or more of crutches. It also depends on your work. If you sit at a desk you might need 1-2 weeks off. If you do heavy labor then you might need 3 months. Read more...
It depends. Their are many different types of bunion procedures. If its a "head procedure" then you can ambulated immediately and probably do a sit down job. If a mid shaft, base or fusion type of procedure it involves being off loaded anywhere from two to three months and probably can do a sit down job. So find out the severity of your bunion and what course the foot and ankle surgeon is opting for. Read more...
It depends... It depends on many factors including your age, general health, healing ability, severity of the deformity, and procedure preformed. Speak with your surgeon and seek their advice. Read more...

Now I have to undergo for an hallux valgus correction operation, should I be concerned?

Follow dr's advice. Make sure you allow yourself a smooth recovery without any setbacks - follow the instructions! Read more...
Concern. Any concern is worthy of your concern. As stated follow directions and realize that young are a big component of your care and the resulting outcome. Read more...
Usually this is an . Elective procedure. You don;t have to do it, you do it only if you want to. Read more...

What to do if I got hallux valgus hammer toe correction surgery.?

What are you . Asking? If you had the surgery you should follow the surgeons post op direction..... Read more...

I got hallux valgus hammer toe correction surgery. How long is the road to recovery?

Ask surgeon. This should have been all spelled out for you before the procedure. There are also different procedures that take different amounts of time to heal. Read more...
Surgery. This not only should have been explained before the surgery , but you should have asked that question. It cannot be answered here as we don't know what was done , how involved, pins , screws , etc. Read more...
It depends... Usually 4-8 weeks but it depends on the type of procedure performed and on the individual that it was performed on. Each person has a different healing potential depending on age and overall health. Read more...
Depends. on the procedure. You can heal in as little as 4 weeks or as long as 12 weeks. It could be longer if you have complications. Most of our patients do very well and the average healing time is around 6 weeks. . Read more...

Does anyone know, after hallux valgus-hammer toe correction surgery, doctor arranged plaster of paris bandage upto knee.?

Bandage. I'm not sure what the question is . Is it that you are surprised at the extent of the cast ? All docs bandage based on their training and what works best in their hands. This should have been discussed before surgery. Read more...
Yes. The doctor did this to immobilize the foot to prevent the surgery from injury if you where to walk on it. Read more...

What exercises can I do if I had bunion (hallux valgus) surgery?

Range of motion. Try and bend your toe up and down. Surgery usually will initially decrease some range of motion, so you want to make sure to prevent or break up any post op adhesions. Read more...
Use a Dynasplint. I fit all my patients with a dynasplint toe unit postoperatively who need increased range of motion. In a published paper we demonstrated that with a dynasplint the range of motion returned quicker and patients were able to use the splint more consistently than home exercises alone. Read more...

What is involved in a hallux valgus surgery and how does it take to fully heal?

See below. There are many different types of hallux valgus procedures, but most involve removal of the bump of bone from the side of the 1st metatarsal and then cutting of the bone at some level and re-positioning the bone and fixating the bone in a new position. Depending at the level of the bone surgery it can take up to 6 months to fully heal. Read more...
3-4 months. Overall, until you are back to full unrestricted activity it will be about 3-4 months. Typically if the bone is cut to fix your hallux valgus, it will take 8-12 weeks for the bone to fully heal. There are many different types of correction they all involve cutting bone and moving it, or fusing them together to achieve appropriate correction. Read more...
Multiple procedures. Depending on the type of hallux valgus - -bunion deformity present, dictates the type of procedure. The most simple, if indicated is a mcbride. This just removes the bump and the patient recuperates with 2-4 weeks and walks immediately. More involved procedures may need a fusion of the joint or a cutting of the bone- osteotomy or joint implant. These procedures extend recuperation. Read more...
Healing times vary. Various surgical procedures are available to treat hallux valgus depending on the type and severity of the deformity. The procedures are designed to correct abnormalities of soft tissues, remove the prominent “bump” of bone, correct the changes in the bony structures, and to realign the big toe and associated structures. The goal of surgery is to reduce pain and improve function. Read more...
Ask your surgeon. Every surgery is different, and depending on what type of procedure you have (screw? Bone cute?), you may be able to walk a few days after surgery, or you might need to be off of it for several weeks. Ask your surgeon when you can progress to weight bearing, when you can start wearing regular shoes, and when you can start exercising. Post-operative x-rays will tell them how fast you're healing. Read more...