My dad has secondary liver cancer. How is this treated?

Multiple ways. Secondary liver cancer refers to metastatic cancer from some organ such as colon cancer. What spreads to the liver is clonal and stays there only increasing in size. If there are 1 to 3 lesions surgery microwave ablation used. If lesions more numerous or large >5cm. chemoebolization employed with chemo directly into the hepatic artery and the vessel then occluded. Yt microspheres also used.

Related Questions

My dad is 53 years old and in good shape. He was diagnosed with stage 4 secondary liver cancer; the primary is still unknown. He has had a CT scan, an endoscopy, and a colonoscopy done. Will a pet scan show something more?

Possibly. More important is the pathology. We rely on pathology and the immunochemistry. The pet may be helpful but sometimes we do not find a primary. This is called a cancer of unknown primary. Read more...
Maybe. Pet/ct scan is a very sensitive test and may very well find additional sites of disease. However, its sensitivity varies depending on the cancer histology and size of tumors. Unfortunately stage 4 means that the disease is advance and metastatic. Finding additional sites of disease may not significantly change the treatment plan and therefore may not be of additional help. Read more...
PET could help. A pet scan could be helpful as any malignancy greater than 1 cm in size should be hot. Small tumors can be behind folds or stool or be missed on colonoscopy for other reasons. A small intestinal cancer would not be found on upper or lower endoscopy. If the doctors are certain that the tumor is not a primary liver tumor, a pet scan should definitely be done. Read more...
A PET scan. May define the source, but does not change the outlook. No tumor that has infiltrated all lobes of the liver from another source has a good outlook. If it will not change therapy or outlook, i would not want a pet for me or a member of my family. Read more...

What do you suggest if my father has secondary liver cancer?

Needs a workup. By secondary liver cancer, I assume your father was found to have cancer in the liver which spread there from other another site. If a biopsy is done, it may indicated what kind of cancer is the primary source. Tests like CT scans may help determine where the cancer started and if it has spread to other areas. This information helps the oncologist determine what the treatment options are. Read more...

Dad has liver cancer - will he live?

Very sorry to hear. Can't answer, though. Depends on how much cancer there is, where it started at (started in the liver or spread to the liver from somewhere else), his general health, and other factors. Even then, we cannot be 100% sure of the outcome of any patient. Talk to his doc, who may be able to give you a better idea. Truly hope he does well. . Read more...
Only God knows... Cancer doctors can make educated guesses based on tumor types, sizes, whether it's spread, and other patient factors (what associated illnesses does your father have and how severe they are). The types of treatment given, the response, and so many factors beyond our control go into living with or dying from a cancer. One thing is sure: A positive attitude helps. Treasure each day, and hope! Read more...

Dad, liver cancer, how long must we suffer?

Suffer? Many primary liver cancers are curable. Heavy, less-treatable liver cancer, primary or metastatic, in the liver used to be fatal in most cases within a year. The key, though, is when to contact hospice. It's Dad's choice, or his health care proxy's, to decide when aggressive treatment stops and hospice starts. The latter will make your life much easier. Read more...

My daughter's dad has liver cancer. I don't know the specifics as I am not privvy to his medical records. What tests can I have done for my daughter?

Liver cancer. Discuss with her pediatrician and see if her dad won't call and give more information to her doctor . Read more...
Relax for now. I agree with Dr Crane. A third party call may help rule out any inheritance issues. Most liver cancer is related to acquired diseases; Hepatitis B or C, liver cirrhosis, alcoholic liver disease, etc.A few are related to inherited metabolic problems that would have been obvious by the fathers childhood,are recessively passed and not likely unless you were a gene carrier. Read more...
Genetic testing. There are 2 liver diseases in which genetics may play a role. Hemochromatosis and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin deficiency may have an increased risk of liver cancer associated with them. These presence of these diseases can be confirmed through genetic testing and through a blood test in the case of Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. If your father-in-law has either of these, get the tests. Read more...

Friends dad has liver cancer that has spread into the blood and reached his brain and is halucinating constantly will he survive?

How long? The hallucinations are likely from the specific area effected by the cancer in brain and in and of themselves do not change survival time. Swelling of the brain is more critical and once there are metastasis to the brain survival time is very limited. Read more...

My dad has an advanced liver cancer an dis taking nexavar (sorafenib) for 3 months. The AFP keeps rising. Does that absolutely mean the cancer is growing?

Possible. Elevation of tumor maker AFP in most of the time is an indication of additional tumor , of course a additional tests also needed to come to that conclusion , speak to his doctor for more information. Read more...

How long does one 5cm large liver cancer tumor grow to spread? Doctor suggested surgery but dad wants to know how long can he wait before surgery?

Well... the smaller the tumor the better the chances at a cure... the sooner the better. Read more...
Don't wait. Length of time depends on the proximity of the cancer to structures that would allow it to spread. Your oncologist and surgeon can give an estimate, but it is not usually beneficial to wait with a cancer. . Read more...