My mom has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (lou gehrigs). What is this exactly?

Bad disease. ALS damages the motor nerve cell in brain and spinal cord causing progressive arm and leg weakness, muscle flickering, with progressive disability. If the disease affects the lower part of the brain, problems with tongue atrophy, swallowing, and breathing can create major crises, and even need for tracheostomy. The sole available drug, Riluzole does delay trach, but no effect on strength.

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What do you suggest if my mom has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (lou gehrigs)?

?research study. This is a very unfortunate situation, as ALS is a very bad disease without a cure. The drug Riluzole can slow the process, and some pts have added gabapentin and memantine to the mix. Have a doctor who is very experienced in neuromuscular disease, and perhaps get involved in a Medical School based research project, involving a newer agent. Read more...

What exactly is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Lou Gehrig's disease. Als is a disease affecting the nerve cell body, causes weakness, muscle wasting, and fasciculations or fluttering of the muscles. It can affect mobility, swallowing, and breathing. There is no known cure to date, and the prognosis is often very poor. We believe it is a disorder of "misfolded proteins", similar in some ways to alzheimer's and parkinson's, but a far rarer condition, fortunately. Read more...

Could kids get amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Similar . But most childhood illnesses which affect the motor neuron, like als, are quite rare, and more hereditary in origin. A variety of such disorders cause weakness in very young children, and adolescents and seem similar in outcome. Also, polio used to affect many children but is almost unknown in usa today. Read more...

What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (als)? Can it be treated?

Lou Gehrig's disease. Als is a disease affecting the nerve cell body, causes weakness, muscle wasting, and fasciculations or fluttering of the muscles. It can affect mobility, swallowing, and breathing. There is no known cure to date, and the prognosis is often very poor. We believe it is a disorder of "misfolded proteins", similar in some ways to alzheimer's and parkinson's, but a far rarer condition, fortunately. Read more...

What are the challenges of living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Very difficult. ALS is a progressive nasty disease with NO cure or even significant control other than Riluzole, and causes muscular atrophy, weakness, fasciculations, and eventual inability to swallow or breathe. As you can imagine, these problems require extensive medical care and diligence, and interventions which may be very complex. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Neurodegenerative. ALS is a neurodegenerative disease of the upper and lower motor neurons. There is a male predominance, and occurs most frequently between the ages of 50 - 60 years. While the most frequent form has a dire prognosis, it does have several variants, with different prognoses that can be prolonged with respect to survival. The diagnosis is based on the clinical findings and robust NCV/EMG studies. Read more...

Last advances in the investigation on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Research still slow. A number of established agents have recently been investigated for their potential as neuroprotective agents, including antibiotics and minocycline. Progress has also been made in exploiting growth factors for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, partly due to advances in developing effective delivery systems to the central nervous system but overall out looks so far is not great yet. Read more...

What is the treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Not good. Lou gehrig's disease remains resistant to successful treatment or control. The drug Riluzole is on the market but is very disappointing, although may delay useage of a tracheostomy tube for a few months. We are learning about a misfolded protein, and this may point the way for future success. Read more...