Multiple sclerosis -- is there loss of use of hands?

Multiple sclerosis. Inflamation attack on myelin covering nerves can attack any group of neuron so could give motor problems like loss of use of limbs.
On occasion. Most often, only one arm is severely afflicted, and other relatively spared, if therapy fails to blunt or stop progression. The key item, is to take potent effective meds such as Tysabri (natalizumab) or Gilenya, as the ultimate goal is to avoid disability, and prevent transition to the secondary progressive phase.

Related Questions

Multiple sclerosis cause loss of use of hands?

It can. Lesions of MS are present at multiple locations in the brain and spinal cord. Depending on the anatomic location of the lesions, a person could lose the use of hands. Legs are generally affected more than arms. Read more...
Consider this. Ms could directly affect hand use, but typically, it involves arm also, and thus, a limb effect, and the loss of use typically occurs during the secondary progressive phase. Often this is reversible, even then, with appropriate treatment. However, many of my patients have experienced carpal tunnel superimposed, and this is readily reversed. So, you need potent ms meds and comorbidities addressed. Read more...

What causes multiple sclerosis and loss of use of hands?

Cause not known. The cause/etiology of MS has not been elucidated. The damage in MS is due to demyelenation of nerve fibers in the central nervous system. It is like losing the insulation on electrical wires and nerve impulses do not travel normally. Depending on the location of the lesions a person may lose the use of hands. Lesions affect legs more than arms. Read more...
Comorbidities. Although ms can cause problems in the arms and hands secondary to lesions in brain and spinal cord, many patients do suffer secondary complications, such as carpal tunnel syndrome or ulnar nerve problems at elbows. B-12 deficiency is seen not uncommonly, and can affect peripheral nerve function, and a diabetic with ms can be especially vulnerable to peripheral nerve problems. (cause, see and). Read more...

Does multiple sclerosis cause you to lose the use of your hands?

Yes. Ms has myriad variations, and each patient is different, but many advanced patients will lose use of one arm and hand, if appropriate therapeutic intervention is not undertaken. Rarely, I have seen bilateral upper limb problems, but more often early on, the legs are most affected. Also, need to consider that ms pts can suffer nerve compressions in the arms which adds to disability. Read more...

With multiple sclerosis, with the patient eventually lose the of use of his hands or legs?

Likely. Lesions of MS are present at multiple locations in the brain and spinal cord. Depending on the anatomic location of the lesions, a person could lose the use of hands and legs. Legs are generally affected more than arms. Read more...
NOT NECESSARILY. It is imperative to treat ms aggressively, but not take inappropriate risks. The newer more potent agents here and, on the way, are not for everybody, but could be used for most. Tysabri (natalizumab) and gilenya, and soon bg-12 and lemtrada, should be used in far more patients, as would sharply decrease the risk of ultimate disability. Vit d supplements would add protection. No rationale to expect wheelchair. Read more...

Can multiple sclerosis affect both hands at the same time?

Yes,cervical cord. Yes, multiple sclerosis can affect either both upper limbs or lower limbs at the same time. Since you are having upper limb problems, either numbness/tingling, weakness or a combination of those, the lesion is likely a plaque in the cervical cord. Depending on the severity of your symptoms, medication may be warranted, but your treating neurologist should know of this new event. Read more...
Yes. Of course! a lesion in the cervical spinal cord, which is a very common place for ms lesions to develop, can certainly cause symptoms in both hands at the same time. If this is a new symptoms you should inform your neurologist. Read more...
Possible. Especially if the disorder has been very progressive and is in a secondary phase. But other causes can co-exist such as carpal tunnel syndrome, and vitamin B-12 deficiency. Read more...

What are good hobbies to take up when you have multiple sclerosis and your hands don't work?

Sorry about hands. Although this is very tough, i commend your search for an attractive way to occupy your time. Perhaps consider charity work, or take classes at local schools to learn about items you may never have had time for. Perhaps watch older movies or read books using newer electronic devices. Travel and museums may be of interest, and perhaps you can become part of a group thru ms society. Read more...

Husband has Multiple Sclerosis. Hand shakes uncontrollably during orgasm. He says it reminds him of his jolt-like symptoms. Is this harmful for him?

Doubt it. The shaking would not worsen the basic disease process , may he have many more. Read more...
Comments. Suspect that he has neuronal short-circuiting due to demyelination over his nerves, and exertion during sex causes symptoms. This in itself is not harmful, but is a clue that he might be wise to use a potent MS agent such as Tysabri, (natalizumab) Lemtrada, or Gilenya. Read more...

Is a prominent horizontal band of sclerosis in T8 -9 and L5-S1 multiple sclerosis, have had dizziness, balance problems and bad hand coordinaton?

Possibly? Depends of what you mean by sclerosis? If there is abnormal findings on the spinal cord itself, possibly MS, but I'd expect there to be abnormal brain MRI as well. If the "sclerosis" is involved in other structures: discs, facet joints, ligaments, etc. Then you can take MS out of the picture. Read more...