7 doctors weighed in:
What is barrett's esophagus?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. John Edmison
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Precancerous entity
Barrett's esophagus occurs when metaplastic columnar epithelium (that predisposes to cancer development) replaces the normal tissue of the esophagus.

In brief: Precancerous entity
Barrett's esophagus occurs when metaplastic columnar epithelium (that predisposes to cancer development) replaces the normal tissue of the esophagus.
Dr. John Edmison
Dr. John Edmison
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Dr. Sidney Vinson
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Precancerous entity
Barrett's esophagus is a precancerous condition where the usual squamous cells of the esophagus are replaced with intestinal type cells (intestinal metaplasia).
It is caused by the reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus which causes burns and ulcers to the esophagus. This tissue then heals in the presence of acid but changes into intestinal type tissue as a protective adaptation.

In brief: Precancerous entity
Barrett's esophagus is a precancerous condition where the usual squamous cells of the esophagus are replaced with intestinal type cells (intestinal metaplasia).
It is caused by the reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus which causes burns and ulcers to the esophagus. This tissue then heals in the presence of acid but changes into intestinal type tissue as a protective adaptation.
Dr. Sidney Vinson
Dr. Sidney Vinson
Thank
Dr. Dean Giannone
Internal Medicine
In brief: Barrett's.
This is a change in the esophagus in response to longstanding reflux.
It is a precancerous change which requires frequent surveillance EGDs to make sure cancer is not developing. If Barrett's is found, the abnormal areas can be ablated so that they do not progress to cancer.

In brief: Barrett's.
This is a change in the esophagus in response to longstanding reflux.
It is a precancerous change which requires frequent surveillance EGDs to make sure cancer is not developing. If Barrett's is found, the abnormal areas can be ablated so that they do not progress to cancer.
Dr. Dean Giannone
Dr. Dean Giannone
Thank
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