What would be the time to heal for a diabetic who needs foot amputation?

THIS DEPENDS ON. Whether there is an infection, circulation problems and how well controlled are sugar levels. These factors determine healing in diabetics.
DEPENDS. On many factors, including how well sugsr is controlled to aid in healing, underlying circulatory problems, infection or not present.
Healing times vary. The healing rates following an amputation can vary depending on various factors including: blood sugar control, the circulation, infection control, and on the exact type of procedure performed.

Related Questions

What would be the time frame for a diabetic who needs foot amputation: is it an emergency?

Each case different. When your doctor recommends amputation it is typically time to do so. Physicians will use this as a last resort. Not doing the amputation can become life threatening due to gangrene and septic shock. Read more...
Infection or pain. Amputation may be urgent if there is an active infection (wet gangrene) or uncontrolled pain. Gangrene could become life threatening in a diabetic patient due to the impaired blood flow and impaired immune system. Read more...
Sometimes. In case of an uncontrolled infection the amputation may need to take place right away. Read more...

How can I avoid a foot amputation if I am diabetic?

Diabetic Foot Care. The best way to avoid diabetic foot ulcers is to keep your blood glucose under control. Also, your pcp should perform a diabetic foot exam using a monofilament to check your foot sensation. You may also want to have diabetic foot care performed by a podiatrist. Read more...
Control the diabetes. Hopefully your diabetes has been well controlled enough that it hasn't affected the circulation in your legs. Once the circulation is compromised, you run the risk of poor healing infections. Once the infections start, its an uphill battle to control them, at times requiring amputations. Read more...
Professional care. Diabetic foot ulcers and infection may often times be prevented with good diabetic foot education and foot care by a professional, tight sugar control, good nutrition, frequent foot inspection and use of properly fitting shoes. Read more...
Good Foot care. The best a diabetic can do is take good care of their feet. Always wear socks and shoes. Make sure the toe area is wide so the shoes do not pinch any part of the foot. Always check inside of shoes before wearing them, a pebble can cause problems for diabetics. Check the feet everyday especially the soles for small open areas that need to be tended. Use a moisturizer. Read more...
Check circulation. Absolutely agree with medical treatment of diabetes being first and foremost in prevention of major amputations. One other thing to keep in mind is the high prevalence of vascular disease amongst diabetics. Consult with a vascular surgeon who can check your ankle-brachial index or toe pressures to figure out if you have significant arterial occlusive disease and to intervene when necessary. Read more...

Can you get a diabetic foot amputation from cheating everyday?

Yes. Diabetics lifetime risk of 15-20% of developing a foot ulcer and of those 15-20% will go on to amputations. Those % are going to increase to 25% in the next few years. Multiple risk factors lead to ulcers and amputation, and high blood sugars is one of them. High blood sugars leads to neuropathy, poor circulation and foot deformities among other things. Keeping your sugars under control is key. Read more...
Cheating on what? Cheating on what? Your diet? Your blood sugar levels? Maintaining low, level blood sugar levels will keep your nerves healthy and functioning, and will ensure you have your optimal healing potential. Uncontrolled blood sugar can lead to neuropathy, ulceration, infection, or amputation. Read more...

Mother, 66, had gangrene/ partial foot amputation, is not diabetic, had 3 stents in her legs due to poor circulation & heavy smoker. Life expectancy?

Statistically... Unfortunately, these effects you describe don't just have an effect on the feet and legs. The effect vital organs are effected as well. 5 years has been reported as an expected life span after an amputation, but this is just an average. It could be more or less depending on many other lifestyle factors. Read more...
Peripheral diseases. Unfortunately, peripheral arterial disease is as common as coronary arterial disease, we just never hear about it. Pad kills more people per year than breast and colon cancers combined. The rate of mortality after amputation (below-knee) is approximately 50% after 5 years and most people (60-70%) will lose their other leg within 5 years once the first amputation has been performed. Read more...
Many variables. It depends on the extent of the amputation, the success of the stent procedure, and the patients other co-morbidities. Read more...