How does smoking affect oral cancer?

Tobacco affects. Tobacco affects the cells lining the mouth, throat and lungs and causes changes in the cells that results in the formation of cancer.
Tobacco=Carcinogen. Tobacco smoke causes oral cancer, lung cancer, throat cancer, and is involved in so many other cancers. If you have never smoked, don't start. If you do smoke, quit yesterday.
Increases. As with lung cancer, the chemicals in cigarettes increase risk of developing mouth (oral) cancer. If you still continue to smoke, be aware of development of differing colors of the inside of your mouth as it maybe cancerous. Also smoking promotes tooth decay and gingivitis due to drying of teeth and from harsh chemicals. Talk with your doctor if you are worried.
Increases. Smoking and smokeless (chewing) tobacco increases the risk of oral cancer. This can involve any part of the oral cavity - lips, tongue, inside of mouth (palate, buccal mucosae), jaw, and throat.

Related Questions

Could smoking weed give you oral cancer?

InconclusiveEvidence. Unfortunately, the current research on cancer and smoking marijuana is mixed. Many epidemiological studies do not seem to show a significant increase in oral cancer risk. Read more...

Could smoking only 2 cigs and 1 cigar lead to oral cancer?

Higly unlikely. Oral cancer caused by tobacco use is really a result of cumulative insults from the cancer-causing compounds. Read more...
A day or ever. If this is a lifetime number than i don't believe so, but if this is a daily habit...It could. Read more...

I'm 21 yrs old what are the realistic chances of me having oral cancer, been smoking 6-7 years on and off?

Realistic? Much higher than one who has never smoked. We used to say that one who starts between age 12 and 17, and smokes for 5 years, then never again, has the same risk as one who starts at 25 and smokes daily for 30 years. Risks are multifactorial: include genetics and co-factors. Like crime, if you can't do the time, don't do the crime. If you can't risk the disease, don't do the deed. Best to quit! Read more...
Smoking. The risk of oral cancer is there, it may not happen now but may occur decades later and you will be really sorry for not kicking the habit at your young age. Read more...
Still Concerning. Oral cancer is devastating. Smoking significantly increases your risk. Other factors like alcohol use and family history are factors in how likely you are to actual get oral cancer. Don't belittle the lifetime impact that even part time smoking can have. There are many tools to help you stop smoking, but the most importantly decide that it's a significant health concern and decide to stop. Read more...
It's like. It's like playing russian roulette with your life! the more you smoke the greater the risk. As the saying goes, even if you have a 1:1000, 000 chance, if you are that one, it's 100%. Your choice, your life. You bear the responsibility of your own actions. I have seen too many of my patients get oral cancer. It's not pretty. Read more...
Smoking? Another question would be do you drink alcohol as well/ have you ever used smokeless tobacco. Do you have a family history of cancer. These things are not an additive effect to your risk they are an exponential effect greatly increasing your risk. With everything that is known about cancer and its risk factors today it is disheartening to have so many people simply ignore them. Do the right thing! Read more...

Can you get oral cancer 6 years after quitting smoking?

Yes. While smoking dramatically increases risk of oral cancer, many people who have never smoked get oral cancer. The longer after one has quit smoking the more the increased risk is reduced, but there is still significant increased risk after 6 years- see http://whyquit.com/whyquit/A_Benefits_Time_Table.html Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial. Read more...
Yes. Risk for oral cancer remains elevated 6 years after stopping smoking, though it does decline from it's highest risk. A 1999 study indicated that after 10 years of no smoking, risk of oral cancer approximates the risk of someone who has never smoked. Drinking alcohol is also a risk factor for oral cancers, so you may want to think about eliminating that risk factor. Keep up the not smoking!! :) Read more...
Yup. You can get oral cancer even if you've never smoked.. smoking and chewing tobacco only increase your chances. The damage to the tissues in your mouth may have occurred years ago and take years to become apparent. As time passes, the chances diminish. Read more...

Can smoking after tooth extraction cause oral cancer? I just got an extraction last night then start to smoke after an hour (they didnt warn me)

Yes but later on! Smoking causes cancer... and there is no doubt about it. So quit smoking Now while it is fresh in your mind and you are still free from it. Development of Cancer from smoking usually takes some years...so right now you are safe but a few years down the road, you will be in serious trouble. So make serious plans to quit smoking....seek professional help from American cancer society(Cancer.net) Read more...

Is smoking 2 puffs of shisha bad, without inhaling? I will never smoke again!!! Amd am I at risk for oral cancer? I dont know whether I have hpv in me

Glad you stopped. You are smarter than most folks. I am glad you are not going to do this again. It's disgusting. Everybody has some mouth cancer risk so keep an eye on your oral mucosa, even though your risk is not much greater than baseline. I am happy for you. Read more...
No. No. Advice - See oral surgeon or ENT doc if you have any of these symptoms: Persistent mouth sore, persistent mouth pain, a lump or thickening in the cheek, a white/red patch on the gums, tongue, tonsil, or lining of the mouth, a sore throat, hoarseness or feeling that something is caught in the throat that does not go away, difficulty swallowing/chewing. Read more...