10 doctors weighed in:

Personal biofeedback apps to help monitor stress?

10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Reidbord
Psychiatry
6 doctors agree

In brief: Several types

Biofeedback aims to decrease the body's stress response by making it conscious & thus more controllable.
Examples: pulse monitor (high heart rate), skin temperature (stress lowers blood flow = cooler), and gsr (subtle sweating measured by electrical conductance, more w stress). Any of these approaches can be effective with practice. I don't know about specific (smartphone?) apps though.

In brief: Several types

Biofeedback aims to decrease the body's stress response by making it conscious & thus more controllable.
Examples: pulse monitor (high heart rate), skin temperature (stress lowers blood flow = cooler), and gsr (subtle sweating measured by electrical conductance, more w stress). Any of these approaches can be effective with practice. I don't know about specific (smartphone?) apps though.
Dr. Steven Reidbord
Dr. Steven Reidbord
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Bob Stewart
I don't know of any mobile device apps either, but GSR and temperature biofeedback devices (thermometers, mood rings) are available from Amazon, bio-medical.com, and others and are simple enough for home use. Monitoring your response is an important part of managing your response.
Dr. Tonya Kozminski
Check out "I stress". App & others with self hypnosis & biofeedback. Some even use heartbeat sensor on camera to monitor progress.
Dr. Rudolf Brutoco
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
2 doctors agree

In brief: Why?

Don't use devices to "monitor" stress.
Find tools to treat, manage, and especially to limit/prevent stress.

In brief: Why?

Don't use devices to "monitor" stress.
Find tools to treat, manage, and especially to limit/prevent stress.
Dr. Rudolf Brutoco
Dr. Rudolf Brutoco
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Dr. Sherry Broadwell
Clinical Psychology

In brief: Quite a few

Agree; better to evaluate/treat.
There are a number of apps that can be useful for tamping down the stress response. You might check out those that have been reviewed by HealthTap docs. One good free app is, "Breathe to Relax." One that you have to purchase that is a bit on the pricey side is Emwave by HeartMath that teaches you how to decrease heart rate variability. Hope this helps.

In brief: Quite a few

Agree; better to evaluate/treat.
There are a number of apps that can be useful for tamping down the stress response. You might check out those that have been reviewed by HealthTap docs. One good free app is, "Breathe to Relax." One that you have to purchase that is a bit on the pricey side is Emwave by HeartMath that teaches you how to decrease heart rate variability. Hope this helps.
Dr. Sherry Broadwell
Dr. Sherry Broadwell
Thank
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