Does pulmonary hypertension cause right atrial enlargement?

PAH. Yes it can. In Pulmonary Hypertension, imagine the right side of the heart as a pump and the pulmonary arteries as a dam. When pulmonary artery pressures keep going up, the blood backs up into the pump (heart) and can affect both chambers of the right side of the heart. The Right Atrium can enlarge and the Right Ventricle can enlarge, become thick, or lose ability to pump properly. .

Related Questions

Difference between pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary atrial hypertension?

Pah. They are the same, you mean pulmonary arterial hypertension. It is high blood pressure in the lung circulation. It needs to be evaluated and treard. Read more...
More specific. Pulmonary hypertension is the General Term to describe hypertension in the pulmonary circulation.Pulmonary arterial hypertension describe the site of the hypertension which is in the arterioles or pre capillary. In contrast pulmonary venous hypertension is post capillary in the pulmonary veins.The latter is commonly due to left heart failure and the former is Idiopathic or unknown cause. . Read more...
PH and PAH. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is often first detected by echocardiogram and may be caused by a variety of conditions. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused narrowing of the small lung arteries and must be diagnosed by heart catheterization. PAH requires treatment by an expert specialist. Read more...
PH vs PAH. PH (pulmonary hypertension) just indicates that the pulmonary artery pressure is increased which could be from any of several causes while pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) means the pulmonary artery pressure is high due to disease in the pulmonary arteries. PAH is a subset of PH but most cases of PH are are result of problems with the left heart and thus don't respond well to PAH medications. Read more...

Is pulmonary hypertension always present in atrial septal defect?

No, but... An ASD (v. Vsd) is much less associated w/ pulm HTN (> 50 mmhg). The degree of "shunting" through the defect needs to quantified via cardiac catheterization. Small ASD can now be closed via catheter=based techniques, but their are many caveats. Evaluation w/ both a interventional cardiologist and pulmonary expert is recommended... Read more...
NO. The patients present in two ways with symptoms of respiratory infection and shortness of breath. In childhood and late in life in middle age. When the children are not treated after diagnosis of large shunt, they may develop pulmonary hypertension. Only in developing countries we see children in a late stage with ASD and pulmonary hypertension. Read more...
No. No, it depends on the size of the defect, the amount of shunting and the age of the patient. Read more...
No. People with asds do not always have pulmonary hypertension. An untreated ASD can potentially lead to pulmonary hypertension over a long period of time. But it's not always present. Read more...

Please explain complications for severely dilated left atrium of 6 CM with moderate pulmonary hypertension with rvsp of 54 mm.?

It depends. I would have to know why there is a severely dilated left atrium. The cause of its dilatation more than likely has lead to the pulmonary hypertension. Also, one has to always keep in mind that an echocardiogram is a very inaccurate way of measuring the rvsp which it seems where your number came from. What is the condition of the mitral valve and what is the ef of this patient? Read more...
LAE and PH. Left atrial enlargement (LAE) and pulmonary hypertension (ph) often indicate that the ph is due to left heart disease, what is called group 2 pulmonary venous hypertension. One needs to determine the cause of the left heart disease before making treatment recommendations. Read more...

Does a right atrium dilated, RV pressure of 25-30 mHg, IVC dynamics 5-10 mmHg subjective possibly of pulmonary hypertension or heart failure?

If accurate, only. mildly ?ed. RA ~10 mmHg, RV systolic ~25 mmg Hg generally ~optimally healthy; similar to the values stated. Thus RA enlargement likely: mismeasurement (common, not rare; study image data yourself), marked tricuspid regurgitation, congenital variant, atrial muscle problem [eg advanced arterial disease in RA arteries; (lumens too small to see by angiography) producing RA ischemia/fibrosis], etc. Read more...

Artrial septial defect with pulmonary hypertension in children?

Talk to MD. As long as there is no reversal of flow which can happen soon due to pulmonary hypertension, a surgical repair may be beneficial. The answer should be given by a cardiologist. Talk to the cardiologist please for your child's sake. Good luck. Read more...