15 doctors weighed in:
Unable to be put under general sedation. Need lumpectomy, can a spinal block be used for breast surgery (along with sedation)?
15 doctors weighed in

Dr. Karen Sibert
Anesthesiology
8 doctors agree
In brief: No
Spinal anesthesia is used for surgery on the lower abdomen (such as a c-section) or on the legs.
It causes profound numbness, and can't be given at a high level such as the breasts or it would interfere with breathing. Any patient can be safe under general anesthesia with the right precautions. Meet with the anesthesiologist ahead of time to discuss any unusual health issues and plan for them.

In brief: No
Spinal anesthesia is used for surgery on the lower abdomen (such as a c-section) or on the legs.
It causes profound numbness, and can't be given at a high level such as the breasts or it would interfere with breathing. Any patient can be safe under general anesthesia with the right precautions. Meet with the anesthesiologist ahead of time to discuss any unusual health issues and plan for them.
Dr. Karen Sibert
Dr. Karen Sibert
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Dr. Luis Villaplana
Internal Medicine
5 doctors agree
In brief: No
No.

In brief: No
No.
Dr. Luis Villaplana
Dr. Luis Villaplana
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Dr. James White
Cosmetic Surgery
4 doctors agree
In brief: Not safe
Lumpectomy of the breast can be completed with local, regional block and IV sedation.
The type of anesthesia depends on the location of the nodule or depth from the skin surface. Tumescent anesthesia techniques that are used in tumescent liposuction are very effective for deeper lesions. Spinal blocks are used for surgical procedures below the level of the respiratory muscles-abdomen, pelvis.

In brief: Not safe
Lumpectomy of the breast can be completed with local, regional block and IV sedation.
The type of anesthesia depends on the location of the nodule or depth from the skin surface. Tumescent anesthesia techniques that are used in tumescent liposuction are very effective for deeper lesions. Spinal blocks are used for surgical procedures below the level of the respiratory muscles-abdomen, pelvis.
Dr. James White
Dr. James White
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Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology
3 doctors agree
In brief: I hope I am not
To late to suggest local anesthesia to permit the lumpectomy/tylectomy/partial mastectomy.
It sounds as if your breathing is the issue. Depending on size and location, local anesthetics can allow a relatively painless removal of the lump, and determine the margins. Once gone, partial breast irradaition may be an option. The type of cancer and margins are critical. I wish you well with this.

In brief: I hope I am not
To late to suggest local anesthesia to permit the lumpectomy/tylectomy/partial mastectomy.
It sounds as if your breathing is the issue. Depending on size and location, local anesthetics can allow a relatively painless removal of the lump, and determine the margins. Once gone, partial breast irradaition may be an option. The type of cancer and margins are critical. I wish you well with this.
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
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2 comments
Dr. Karen Sibert
Depending on the size and location of the mass, it may be very difficult to achieve painless surgery with local anesthesia alone. For some patients, sedation is MORE dangerous than general anesthesia. Anesthesiology consultation is very important in advance of surgery.
Dr. Karen Sibert
Cherie-Make sure your COPD and asthma are under the best control possible. Many anesthesia gases are good bronchodilators. Emphysema is not a contraindication to general anesthesia. Best of luck!
Dr. Mitchell Zeitler
Anesthesiology
In brief: Yes, sort of.
But i would not recommend it.
In europe they do cardiac bypass surgery with thoracic epidural blocks. In your case it would be overkill. Local with sedation (either light or deep sedation). Find a surgeon who prefers to do these surgeries using this method and it should go very well.

In brief: Yes, sort of.
But i would not recommend it.
In europe they do cardiac bypass surgery with thoracic epidural blocks. In your case it would be overkill. Local with sedation (either light or deep sedation). Find a surgeon who prefers to do these surgeries using this method and it should go very well.
Dr. Mitchell Zeitler
Dr. Mitchell Zeitler
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