Scleroderma and autonomic nervous system, how are they related?

Can be neurological. We can see this with scleroderma and other connective tissue dieases. Your physicians can help to evaluate for this but most of the consideration is clincial with very few specific testing. This occurs because of the associated vascular changes with scleroderma adn otehr connective tissue diseases. Vasculitis can also occur.

Related Questions

Describe the features of an autonomic nervous system disorder.?

A broad topic. The autonomic nervous system controlls body functions that occur automatically. This includes heart rate, breathing, blood pressure and sweating among others. Autonomic disorder can be many and varied. An example would be failure of the blood pressure to increase when stading from a lying position causing dizziness or fainting. Another may be a fast resting heart rate. Talk to your doctor for more. Read more...
Various. Your autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls virtually all the organs and systems in your body. If your sympathetic nervous system(sns) hyper - you could have cold hands, palpitations, sweating, htn, dry mouth, constipation, dry eyes, dry mouth. If your parasympathetic (pns) is hyper, you could have urgent urination, diarrhea, gas, bloating, watery eyes, allergies, asthma, low blood pressure... Read more...

Can you describe the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system?

Almost all organs. Sudden drop blood pressure, impotense, changes in skin colour, incontinence, lack of sweating, changes in heart rate, etc. Read more...
Autonomic nervous sy. Dysfunction affects the motor innervation of smooth muscles, heart muscle & gland cells. It can affect the sympathetic or the parasympathetic components, or both. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: autonomic nervous system?

Involuntary function. The autonomic nervous system is part of the peripheral nervous system. It is ‘autonomic’ because it does not require voluntary thought to function. The autonomic nervous system is divided into the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. The sympathetic system manages “fight or flight” responses and the parasympathetic system acts as a counterpart that manages “rest and digest” functions. Read more...
Autonomic NS. Is part of peripheral nervous system that acts as a control system functioning largely below the level of consciousness, to control visceral functions. It affects heart rate, respiratory rate, digestion, salivation, perspiration, pupils dilation, urination, & sexual arousal. Read more...

What happens when your autonomic nervous system isn't functioning properly? What are the symptoms?

Read . Autonomic failure is a disorder of noradrenergic neurotransmission in which postganglionic sympathetic neurons do not release norepinephrine appropriately. Subnormal norepinephrine release results in impaired vasoconstriction and reduced intrathoracic vascular volume, both of which contribute to orthostatic hypotension. The absence of an appropriate reflex-induced increase in heart rate as the blo. Read more...

What causes dysautonomia (dysfunction of autonomic nervous system)?

Dysautonomia. Several, such as diabetes, autoimmune disorders, connective tissue diseases, parkinson's disease, lyme disease, hereditary, injury to brain or spinal cord. Read more...
High and low BS. One of the biggest culprits in autonomic dysfunction is fluctuating blood sugars (bs)if the bs is too low your sympathetic nervous system will be stimulated, if the bs is too high, your parasympathetic nervous system will be stimulated. By keeping bs stable you can reduce dysautonomia. Read more...