Radical mastectomy is a type of surgery for breast cancer that involves removing all of the breast tissue, is this true?

Yes. A radical mastectomy is an older operation that is not performed anymore. It involved removing the entire breast, the pectoralis major muscle and all of the lymph nodes underneath the arm. A modified radical mastectomy might be what you are asking about. This operation removes the entire breast along with all of the lymph nodes underneath the arm.

Related Questions

I'm having acute pain from my radical mastectomy surgery wednesday. Normal? I have high risk breast cancer

Pain after surgery. You r expected to have some pain, often worse 2-3 days following the procedure because of inflammation of the traumatized tissues. If if the pain is too severe, you should contact your surgeon for instruction...Possible increase of pain meds or re-eval for possible infection etc...I wish you well on your course to recovery! good luck.. Read more...
Not normal. Acute pain, post-surgery is not normal. Contact your doctor. "high risk" breast cancer is no reason for acute pain. Read more...
Call your surgeon. It is normal to have some level of pain for the next few weeks after your sugery. I recommend you contact your surgeon and be evaluated. Read more...

How effective is a radical mastectomy for treating breast cancer?

Mastectomy . Mastectomy is generally very effective, however chemotherapy and radiation are sometimes recommended as well. It really depends on the type of cancer, how aggressive it is, and wether there has been spread to other areas or lymph nodes. In early stages mastectomy can cure 95-98% of women. Your breast surgeon/oncologist can/should provide specifics based on your case. Read more...

Does breast cancer reconstruction surgery look natural? I have to undergo a double mastectomy for breast cancer and am deciding whether to have breast cancer reconstruction surgery. Would the surgery leave my breasts feeling hard and unnatural? I might ch

Every . Every patient may have a different experience with implants. The majority of implants are not hard at all. There is another type of breast reconstruction called tram flap reconstruction that does not require the use of implants. Today women can also participate in picking out the color of the nipple to be tattooed onto the reconstructed breast. Some surgeons actually make a nipple using the patients' skin. The majority of reconstructed breasts that I have seen in my practice are beautiful. We have many talented plastic surgeons. Read more...
No depending on how. Tram flap with your own tissue movement to recreate your breasts may have areas of fat necrosis - hardness. Subpectoral muscle silicone implants are more natural feeling but you may get a capsule a tight feeling . Best answer-- ask your plastic surgeon his experience - they have pictures good and bad to give you an idea of results then you can make an itelligent choice of what is right. Read more...
Options. There are many options available to patients needing reconstruction. The most natural way is using your own tissues. A diep flap is the most cutting edge way to achieve this natural result. It is using the abdominal fat /skin only (no muscle - as sacrificing your muscle is a tram). Find a diep center as this is a challenging technique that requires experience and expertise. Read more...
Breast cancer. No a breast reconstruction should not feel hard or unnatural. The main surgery i perform is the diep flap which uses the skin and fat of the abdomen to create natural feeling and appearinbrg breasts. With the release of silicone implants in the us market over the last few years we now can perform implant based reconstruction are natural in appearance and soft to the touch. Please see plastic surg. Read more...

Please let me know if there is a way to prevent breast cancer, health issues, by removing breast tissue but leaving nerves and putting an implant?

Yes, Many options av. Yes there are several ways to protect yourself from breast cancer depending on your family and personal history. A good oncologist can guide you. You have at least 3 options: be under close supervision of an expert who can screen and detect cancer early if it ever appears on the scene. Prophylactic mastectomy is an option but not recommended. Preventive medicines are available and are quite effect. Read more...

My mom, my grandma and my mom's sister all had breast cancer (and died). I was told that mastectomy reduce the risks for me. Is that true?

Yes, very likely. Breast Cancer is a genetic disease. In 5-10% of cases, it runs in the family. That seems to be the case here. This is what Angelina Jolie had(it is called BR-CA positive Breast Cancer). Removal of both breasts before Cancer develops is one good solution for this type of breast Cancer. Your doctor can easily run the BRACA test for you and a genetic counselor can further guide you in this regard. Read more...

Is there a chance of getting cancer in the tissue of the breast reconstruction? I am considering getting breast reconstruction after having a mastectomy. I am nervous about whether I could get breast cancer again. Is the tissue where incisions and cuts we

It . It depends on why type of cancer it is, but mostly that is not the case. Read more...
There . There are multiple angles to this question that i will address. I think you are asking if reconstruciton will increase teh risk of getting cancer. And the answer is no. However, there is a risk of cancer recurrence simply from the mastectomy. For this reason, many plastic surgeons initially recommended waiting 5 years after mastectomy prior to beginning reconstruciton to ensure that you were free of disease. That is no longer the case. Another consideration is that an implant may obscure or delay detection of a cancer recurrence and while this may be true, it has not been shown to alter longevity. Read more...
Yes and no. Breast cancer can come back after either lumpectomy or mastectomy. Breast reconstruction does not increase the risk of cancer recurrence. The risk of recurrent breast cancer after mastectomy is the same whether you choose to undergo breast reconstruction or not. However, recurrent breast cancer, like any cancer, grows into surrounding tissues, which can include the reconstructed breast. Read more...
Breast Cancer. Breast cancer will not develop in tissue that is used to perform breast reconstruction. Bc develops in tissue left behind or near the site of tumor removal. If there is concern about the ability to check for cancer recurrence such as when a tumor is close to the chest wall then i suggest the case be reviewed by the tumor board so that a clear plan for surveillance is understood before a recon! Read more...

If I had breast cancer, mastectomy, and implant on left side, will mammograms be able to pick up new tumor in leftover tissue?

Not needed. Mastectomies, by definition, involve removal of (almost) all of the breat tissue present. While it is true that microscopic amounts of breast tissue can be left behind, this is not amenable to mammographic evaluation, regardless of whether a reconstruction was done. Careful physical examination remains the best way to screen for local cancer recurrence following a mastectomy. Read more...
Yes. Mammography would be useful. If questions arise MRI would be best but ultrasound would be useful. Read more...
Breast. I agree with both of the answers posted. I would say that it is difficult because each breast is different and the fat plan decreases as you get closer to the nipple are polar complex. If any event a mammogram is not needed after mastectomy and implant recon but can be used to evaluate the remaining tissue. Physical exam by the doctor is very important help guide any studies needed. Read more...

I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2000 I had radical bilateral mastectomy chemo and radiation I had metastasis to the rib in 2006 and 2010 recent biopsy of lymph nodes on the left upper chest near my clavicle and neck showed adenocarcinoma what treatm

Chemo and/or radiati. Your case is too complicated for a simple answer. You need to be in a cancer center where your treatment can be tailored to what your specific case requires. Sorry i can't provide more info. Read more...
Many options. I agree with the other answer: need more information. You may need hormonal, chemo and/or biologic treatment. Many good chances to get better. Good luck! Read more...

36 year-old woman whose mother was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 34 and a PALB2 mutation wonders if mastectomy is needed to lower her risk.....?

You need testing. If your mother was a BRCA carrier then it is important that you get tested. Since you know that she has a PLAB2 mutation then your testing can even be more precise. If you are a carrier then see an experienced breast surgeon. They can calculate your lifetime risk as well as your 5 year risk to help you make your decisions regarding mastectomy and ovary removal. Read more...
You are doing fine. You are already under good supervision which includes proper genetic counseling in terms of future testing or any active intervention. Annual breast physical examination along with annual MRI of both breasts to screen for early breast cancer would be adequate in my view. I do not recommend risk reduction mastectomy except in folks with BRCA mutation. You should complete your family(have children, if desired, before the age of 40 years). Read more...
Higher risk but not like BRCA. I am glad that you are seeing a GC as this area is evolving rapidly. PALB2 is a high-risk mutation but its risk is dependent on your family history and age. Your risk of lifetime breast cancer will be significantly higher than the average population (estimated 30-35% versus 12%). This is less than BRCA which is as high as 60-80%. Thus, bilateral mastectomy is a choice and not as strongly rec for PALB2. Surveillance should follow high-risk guidelines including MRI. Read more...
Close supervision. www.Breastcancer.org http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1400382?query=featured_home& By age 50 y/o 14 % of women with PALB2 mutation will have been diagnosed with, not died of, breast cancer, by 70 y/o that number is 35 %. A 34 y/o today is 14 and 36 years, respectively, away from those targets. We will have better diagnostic tools and better treatment by then. No data exists, whether women with prophylactic mastectomy do better. Advice: Close observation with MRI (not mammogram: radiation) and ideally follow up at a cancer center that takes care of other women with PALB2 mutation. Read more...
Is an option. This is a complicated issue and personal choice. There should be a percentage risk that you'd develop cancer and that would help to direct you. If it's, say, 80%, I would seriously consider removal. The options really include bilateral mastectomy vs. close surveillance, which should include MRI of the breast, breast exams and mammograms on more frequent basis than yearly, which it seems you're doing now. Read more...
Woud Work. With a mutation and a family history of breast cancer, having a bilateral prophylactic mastectomy would definitely lower the risk. The big question is how much risk would it lower and is it NEEDED? The needed is a question you will have to answer after you have discussed it and all your risks with your surgeon. Definitely would decrease the risk, but without full history, hard to say is needed. Read more...
Breast cancer. . This a complex question that is more appropriate for a direct face to face discussion. There are a number options that are valid. But for starters you need to get tested. . Read more...
Stop all medications. sorry that you have unusual unknown forms of metabolic, immune genetic defect No-one knows too much of it you can only save yourself by cut out all the meds. " If u don't take, you don't die--then don't take" especially the nutritional supplements like vitamin E, omega3 etc and immune suppressants they feed cancer cells before feed regular cells must have very healthy life style and don't respond to stress, stay happy do breast self exam and MRI instead X-ray worthless good luck. Read more...
It depends. The genetic councilor should be able to tell the chance of you having breast cancer in the future based on your entire family tree and the exact type of mutation. It would probably be around 40-60%. Higher screening is an acceptable option if you can get it regularly enough and be aggressive as soon as it is found. It is a difficult decision to make. There is also, anti-hormonal therapy that would reduce your risk of breast cancer. I would make the decision based on your lifestyle an access to healthcare. If you can have adequate and reliable follow ups then may be do that. If you are too nervous about it, then have the mastectomy. It is a difficult decision to make and needs to be tailored to you personally. Read more...
No! Although the PALB2 mutation increases risk, preventive mastectomy is not recommended. There are other ways to decrease your risk including taking raloxifene or tamoxifen. See a medical oncologist to discuss this (and a genetic counselor! ) Read more...