Does fluocinonide work for hand eczema?

Yes. Frequent lubrication and once or twice daily topical steroid such as Fluocinonide are standard. Frequent exposure to soaps, solvents, foods, hair &etc aggravate hand eczema. Warm gloves in winter are a must. Sometimes a more potent steroid cream is needed. Prednisone @ 20 mg 3 times a week m-w-f for short periods will help if topicals fail.

Related Questions

Is hand eczema a permanent condition?

Not always. If you have hand eczema due to exposure to irritants (dishwater, chemicals, etc) then avoidance of those will resolve your eczema. Cold weather, frequent handwashing, incomplete drying can aggrevate eczema. Sometimes 'eczema' is actually an infection. There are many products available otc as well as prescription. If your dr. Can't help, ask for derm referral. Read more...

Is "Hand Eczema" and "Atopic Eczema" the same thing? Yes or No?

Eczema. atopic eczema can effects hands or other parts, hand eczema is hand only. Read more...
Eczema. Yes both are eczema and the atopic eczema refers to a specific distribution of the skin involved. Read more...
Can be. Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing dermatitis that is a type of eczema specifically associated with the other "atopic" (literally, "strange") illnesses: allergic rhinitis (nasal allergies) and asthma. The term eczema is non-specific; dry, rough, scaly, itchy rash, anywhere. AD:anywhere, but prefers (based on age): cheeks, then front arms/legs, then backs of legs, then, by 19, hands. Read more...

How to stop hand eczema from itching?

Itchy hand eczema. Be sure you have been diagnosed by a doctor. An itchy rash on your hand could be contact dermatitis or atopic dermatitis, or a fungal infection, etc. If it's contact, you want to try to find out what to avoid touching. If atopic dermatitis, you want to check out your food and inhalant allergies and treat them. For the itch itself, use antihistamines, corticosteroid or calcineurin inhibitor cream. Read more...
Topical steroids. Topical steroids creams or ointments are effective treatments for hand eczema. Sometimes a contact allergy can cause hand dermatitis, so it may be helpful to consult a dermatologist or allergist. Read more...

What to do if I have really painful hand eczema?

See your doctor. Painful eczema can occur when the skin blisters and cracks open. Using good hand creams to moisturize will help some however stonger topical medications by prescription may be needed. See your doctor or dermatolgist for better long term optinos. Be well. Read more...

Are any emollients good for hand eczema?

Yes. All emollients are good for hand eczema. Many people find cetaphil restoraderm to be particularly helpful. If that doesn't work then the prescription epiceram is helpful. Read more...

I want to be a surgical tech. How can I keep my hand eczema from flaring up, especially with all the hand washing?

Make sure it is. eczema and not psoriasis. May not be able to prevent the flare ups. I hope this helps. If you still have questions or concerns about this issue contact me at www.healthtap.com/dryetimyan. Read more...

Does anyone knows of any emollient cream which is very good for hand eczema?

I like neutrogena. I like neutogena hand cream. But it's totally a matter of trial & error: what feels best to you, what works best for you. Read more...
Petrolatum products. Products containing petrolatum, glycerin, lanolin, dimethicone, shea butter, mineral oil are all good for hand eczema. Some brands are o'keefe's working hands cream, aquaphor. Vaseline, neutrogena norwegian formula, udder cream, bag balm, aveeno (oatmeal) intense relief hand cream, eucerin intensive repair hand cream. Read more...

Can you guide please how to deal with hand eczema try different treatments and consult doctors but did not get permanent result?

Skin hydration. Skin hydration is the single most important treatment in eczema. Using an ointment (like vaseline) multiuple times a day and wearing gloves over the vaseline at night will help. Avoidance of triggers like allergens, harsh soaps and chemicals, and cold weather/low humidity will also help. Lastly, application of steroid creams can help as well. See an allergist or dermatologist. Read more...