10 doctors weighed in:
In adult onset primary hypersomnia, is it reasonable to take beta blockers if effective in contolling the high pulse side effect of methylphenidate?
10 doctors weighed in

Dr. Jacques Conaway
Internal Medicine - Sleep Medicine
4 doctors agree
In brief: Not exactly.
Beta-blockers are helpful for a variety of medical disorders, but like many medications are not entirely benign.
Side effects include daytime fatigue and sleep disruption. What you have described is not a clear indication for beta blocker therapy - risk may outweigh benefit. Please consult with a local sleep specialist for further information.

In brief: Not exactly.
Beta-blockers are helpful for a variety of medical disorders, but like many medications are not entirely benign.
Side effects include daytime fatigue and sleep disruption. What you have described is not a clear indication for beta blocker therapy - risk may outweigh benefit. Please consult with a local sleep specialist for further information.
Dr. Jacques Conaway
Dr. Jacques Conaway
Thank
Dr. Colin Kerr
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree
In brief: Hypersomnia
Yes. The beta-blockers should work in this context; they will slow the pulse, but you are also getting a new set of potential side effects, one of which is drowsiness.
It is likely that the methylphenidate will outweigh this effect, but it is an individual matter. You'll have to try it and see. Otherwise, it is quite safe.

In brief: Hypersomnia
Yes. The beta-blockers should work in this context; they will slow the pulse, but you are also getting a new set of potential side effects, one of which is drowsiness.
It is likely that the methylphenidate will outweigh this effect, but it is an individual matter. You'll have to try it and see. Otherwise, it is quite safe.
Dr. Colin Kerr
Dr. Colin Kerr
Thank
Dr. Jerome Zacks
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
In brief: Somnolence
Speak with the doctor(s) who prescribed the two drugs; tell them your current symptoms to see if they might recommend a change in the dosages of the medications.

In brief: Somnolence
Speak with the doctor(s) who prescribed the two drugs; tell them your current symptoms to see if they might recommend a change in the dosages of the medications.
Dr. Jerome Zacks
Dr. Jerome Zacks
Thank
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