3 doctors weighed in:

What do "frozen shoulder"symptoms feel like when you try to move?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Washburn
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Limited motion

Many things can cause pain or limit your ability to fully move your shoulder. However, limits in passive motion (that is, you remain relaxed while an examiner attempts to lift and move the shoulder) are common in frozen shoulder.

In brief: Limited motion

Many things can cause pain or limit your ability to fully move your shoulder. However, limits in passive motion (that is, you remain relaxed while an examiner attempts to lift and move the shoulder) are common in frozen shoulder.
Dr. John Washburn
Dr. John Washburn
Thank
Dr. Shawn Hennigan
Orthopedic Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Pain

Pain in frozen phase typically occurs at the end range of motion.
However, the symptoms as far as subjective description and location are not distinguishable from other causes of shoulder pain. Main finding is limited range of motion, with negative x-ray (for arthritis).

In brief: Pain

Pain in frozen phase typically occurs at the end range of motion.
However, the symptoms as far as subjective description and location are not distinguishable from other causes of shoulder pain. Main finding is limited range of motion, with negative x-ray (for arthritis).
Dr. Shawn Hennigan
Dr. Shawn Hennigan
Thank
Dr. Thomas Deberardino
Orthopedic Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Hard stop to motion

Most patients complain of pain about a significantly decreased total arc of motion.
Certain planes of motion may be moreso affected or not in different patients. The thickened shoulder capsule loses its normal resiliency and suppleness creating a "hard stop" past which further active or passive motion is not feasible.

In brief: Hard stop to motion

Most patients complain of pain about a significantly decreased total arc of motion.
Certain planes of motion may be moreso affected or not in different patients. The thickened shoulder capsule loses its normal resiliency and suppleness creating a "hard stop" past which further active or passive motion is not feasible.
Dr. Thomas Deberardino
Dr. Thomas Deberardino
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Warren Strudwick
Board Certified, Sports Medicine
26 years in practice
490K people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors