Do you need to have a lump in the breast to have breast cancer?

No. Some early breast cancers do not present with a lump or mass. They present with findings on a mammogram or ultrasound. Calcifications commonly present with out a palpable mass.
Nope. Very often there is not a lump and the cancer is just picked up on imaging.
Not at all. Very often breast cancer is diagnosed on a screening mammogram done in a patient with no signs or symptoms of cancer.
Absolutely not! Actually, the main goal of mammograms is to find cancer before you could feel them. We often identify breast cancer that is as small as a few grains of sand. Mammograms save lives!

Related Questions

What can a breast cancer lump feel like?

It is harder than yo. It would feel harder than your breast is. Most often you can roll it under the flat part of your hand's fingers. If you are suspicious, get a physician to check you and show you how to feel for it. If there is a lump you should immediately consult your doctor for further evaluation and make sure that it is not cancerous. Read more...

How to tell if it's breast cancer in a lump?

Eval by breast surg. If there's a new lump that's drawing attention/concern, seek immediate medical attention and referral to a breast surgeon. Beyond clinical impression, imaging will often suggest what the lesion is but the most definitive diagnosis usually comes via a needle (i.E aspiration or core biopsy). Read more...
Biopsy. The only way to know for sure if a breast lump is cancer or not is with a biopsy - a procedure in which a small amount of the lump is removed and then examined by a pathologist under the microscope. Mammogram, ultrasound and MRI can give a good idea if a lump is cancer or not, and depending on the results of imaging studies, biopsy may not be necessary. Read more...
Pathologist. The lump should be biopsied or removed and the tissue examined by a pathologist to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Read more...

Does breast cancer always have visible lump?

No. Many invasive breast cancers are identified by radiologic means(mammogram/mri) without any physically visible or even palpable masses/lumps, which is why mammograms are very important for screening. Read more...
No. In fact, the majority of breast cancers in the us are found without a visible lump. Obviously, a visible lump needs to be evaluated, regardless. Read more...

With regards to breast cancer, what is a lump?

Tumor. When referring to a cancerous lump, most people are describing a tumor that they can palpate, rather than one identified by mammography. Of course, "lump" is a very generic term--most breast lumps are not cancers. However, it requires medical evaluation to differentiate benign from malignant ones. Read more...
Not sure. What you are asking. Breast cancer, if large enough, can form a lump in the breast that you or your doctor can feel. Read more...

I have a lump on my brest is it breast cancer?

Not likely. At your age it is very rare for you to have a breast cancer, but not impossible. Even if you have a strong family history, your "lump" is more likely to be a cyst or fibroadenoma. But, your really should see your doctor's help, so make an appointment. Good luck. Read more...
Probably not, but... It would be rare for a 22 year old to develop breast cancer. However you should alert your friendly primary care physician as to any changes you detect in your breasts. Read more...

How to tell if it's a breast cancer or other lump?

Breast mass. Other than a biopsy of the lump there is no guaranteed way of telling is something is a cancer or not. Mammogram, ultrasound or breast MRI may indicate the lump has a higher risk of cancer because of shape, calcifications within the lump or reaction around it but none of those are a sure way to diagnose it. Biopsy is still the only way to really diagnose it. Read more...
See your doctor. It is very difficult to distinguish a benign breast lump from a cancer for patient and doctor. Depending upon age and physical examination findings, we will often get a mammogram and ultrasound to help evaluate a breast lump, sometimes culminating in a (nonsurgical) needle-biopsy--ultimately, the only way to be 100% certain is to look at the tissue under the microscope. Read more...
Biopsy. It often requires a biopsy, needle or open, or fine needle aspirate to differentiate a benign lump from cancer. Please consult your doctor. Read more...

What are signs that a lump could be breast cancer?

Signs+symptoms. The signs and symptoms of breast cancer include: a lump or thickening in or near the breast or in the underarm that persists through the menstrual cycle; change in the size, shape, or contour of the breast; blood-stained or clear fluid discharge from the nipple; change in the feel or appearance of the skin on the breast or nipple (dimpled, puckered, scaly, or inflamed). New lump - see your doc. Read more...
Hard to Tell. It is very difficult to distinguish a benign breast lump from a cancer by exam alone, for patient and doctor. In general, cancers tend to be rock-hard, 3-dimensionally round, and can feel "fixed" within the breast. Depending upon age and physical examination findings, we will often get a mammogram and ultrasound to help evaluate a breast lump, sometimes culminating in a (nonsurgical) biopsy. Read more...
Signs. A lump is a lump, but a lump that is associated with skin puckering or dimpling, nipple inversion, bloody nipple discharge, or palpable bulky underarm lymph nodes is highly suspicious for cancer. Read more...