4 doctors weighed in:

Should i use saline water to increase my sodium level. I have hep c n cirohsis...am on diuretic?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kenneth Gibbs
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Low sodium

The reason your sodium is low is because of an imbalance between the amount of fluid and the amount of sodium in your body.
For instance your total sodium may be normal but your body fluid may be high thus making the concentration low. You need to see your MD to advise you on the appropriate treatment.

In brief: Low sodium

The reason your sodium is low is because of an imbalance between the amount of fluid and the amount of sodium in your body.
For instance your total sodium may be normal but your body fluid may be high thus making the concentration low. You need to see your MD to advise you on the appropriate treatment.
Thank
Dr. Stephen Southard
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

You have to understand that the low sodium levels seem with persons with cirrhosis that is related to abnormalities in the kidney's handling of water and sodium. You don't want to consume more sodium in this case as it may worsen fluid retention.
You will need to be careful about how much electrolyte free water you take in. The exact restriction is best determined between you and your doctor.

In brief: No

You have to understand that the low sodium levels seem with persons with cirrhosis that is related to abnormalities in the kidney's handling of water and sodium. You don't want to consume more sodium in this case as it may worsen fluid retention.
You will need to be careful about how much electrolyte free water you take in. The exact restriction is best determined between you and your doctor.
Thank
Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology

In brief: No

Please read my earlier post to you.
More info: the measured serum sodium is not an absolute, total body sodium measurement. It's a concentration. With cirrhosis, there is more excess water than excess sodium (but sodium is in EXCESS), so the number appears low - because it's diluted. If you take extra salt, it will only appear as swelling: in your legs and tummy.

In brief: No

Please read my earlier post to you.
More info: the measured serum sodium is not an absolute, total body sodium measurement. It's a concentration. With cirrhosis, there is more excess water than excess sodium (but sodium is in EXCESS), so the number appears low - because it's diluted. If you take extra salt, it will only appear as swelling: in your legs and tummy.
Thank
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