17 doctors weighed in:

My dad has "40% stenosis at it's origin" in LAD & 40% plaque in the OM1 of LCx. He takes aspirin, beta blocker & chol. drugs. His heart attack risk?

17 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stanley Berger
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
12 doctors agree

In brief: Manageable

If he has no symptoms, the recommended medical regimen includes the medications he is taking.
The only addition, based on his risk factors, would be an ACE inhibitor (highly recommended for diabetes, but may also be helpful otherwise). He should not smoke and all around him should not smoke. If he can be active in moderation, that's good! He should be aware of symptoms and notify his doc ASAP!

In brief: Manageable

If he has no symptoms, the recommended medical regimen includes the medications he is taking.
The only addition, based on his risk factors, would be an ACE inhibitor (highly recommended for diabetes, but may also be helpful otherwise). He should not smoke and all around him should not smoke. If he can be active in moderation, that's good! He should be aware of symptoms and notify his doc ASAP!
Dr. Stanley Berger
Dr. Stanley Berger
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1 comment
Dr. Mark Lubienski
Agree with answer but should add moderate exercise 4-5 days /week to lessen risk even more once he is educated as to symptoms to watch for and start slowly and build up to that level of exercise over weeks to months
Dr. Kenneth Gibbs
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Risk assessment

This is a difficult question since most estimates are in patients without known CAD.
As a starting point assume 20% 10 year risk of an event that can be modified by not smoking, taking statins, controlling blood pressure and weight and exercise 30 mins at least 3x per week. He sounds like the meds are appropriate. The % above and location is not as important as the fact that he has CAD.

In brief: Risk assessment

This is a difficult question since most estimates are in patients without known CAD.
As a starting point assume 20% 10 year risk of an event that can be modified by not smoking, taking statins, controlling blood pressure and weight and exercise 30 mins at least 3x per week. He sounds like the meds are appropriate. The % above and location is not as important as the fact that he has CAD.
Dr. Kenneth Gibbs
Dr. Kenneth Gibbs
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Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology

In brief: At risk

You father has non-obstructive coronary disease.
Plaques can rupture and result in heart attack unpredictably. You cannot make this risk go away but you can reduce it by using a high potency statin drug, regardless of his cholesterol level, daily low dose aspirin, not smoking, and doing daily moderate exercise. Stents or Bypass surgery will not reduce his risk for non-obstructive disease.

In brief: At risk

You father has non-obstructive coronary disease.
Plaques can rupture and result in heart attack unpredictably. You cannot make this risk go away but you can reduce it by using a high potency statin drug, regardless of his cholesterol level, daily low dose aspirin, not smoking, and doing daily moderate exercise. Stents or Bypass surgery will not reduce his risk for non-obstructive disease.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Dr. Bennett Werner
Thank
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