Why should I be concerned about breast cancer?

You have breasts. Breast cancer will affect 1 in 9 women. The biggest risk factor for breast cancer, is having breasts. Although we hear alot about it, most of us will not get breast cancer. Your risk may be increased if you have a family history, had an abnormal biopsy, never have children, or gain a large amount of weight as an adult. You do not need to be concerned but be aware of your own body.
No one is immune. Considering the lifetime risk of developing breast ca in the us is 1:8, how can you not be? It is a common misconception that people who have no family history are not at risk; in truth, breast cancer is an environmental disease, unrelated to heredity in almost 90% of cases. We have made few inroads in breast ca prevention, but have learned that when you catch it early, the cure rates are high.

Related Questions

Should I be concerned about breast cancer? Who is most at risk?

Family history. While breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, it is relatively uncommon in 38 year old women. At that age, a family history of breast, ovarian, pancreatic, uterine or prostate cancer(in men), childhood sarcomas & some other cancers in close relatives can increase risk. Get the best family history you can & check reliable genetic internet sites for info. Exercise, don't gain weight,etc. Read more...

What to do if I have a mark on my breast should I be concerned about breast cancer?

???? Impossible to tell with the information provided. My advice: have your doc take a look at it. Hopefully is nothing serious but young women can develop breast cancer. Read more...

Should I be concerned about breast cancer when I have milky draininge from my breasts (its not mastitis)? Multiple family members had breast cancer

Worth checking out. Milky discharge is common and doesn't necessarily means you have breast cancer. It could be physiologic, side effects from medications or drugs, xs stimulation of the nipples, a pituitary tumor, pregnancy...See your doctor to have it evaluated for cause and of course, to rule out cancer. Good luck. Read more...
Probably OK. If the drainage is milky (and not bloody or looking like fluid in a blister) it is probably ok, especially if you are pre-menopausal. You should probably see a breast speciialist to be sure. If your family history puts you at high enough risk, an MRI may be a better screening than mammography. Look up the gail model on the net to calculate your risk. Read more...

Should women be concerned about breast cancer?

Yes. Yes, but not paranoid. Make healthy choices and have routine testing when appropriate. Breast cancer treatments are now very successful. Read more...
Yes. 1 in 8 women in the US will develop breast cancer in their lifetime, and most women affected will have no definable risk factor. Therefore, at this time, it is critical for all women over age 40 to have a screening mammogram (yearly). When breast cancer is caught before it becomes palpable, the chance for cure is very high and the treatment options are greatest. Mammograms save lives! Read more...

I'm concerned about breast cancer. Please help?

Go to this. Go to this link for a more thorough answer than i can give you in this space: http://www.Mayoclinic.Com/health/breast-cancer/ds00328/dsection=symptoms and of course, you should see your doctor if you are concerned, asap. Read more...
Do you have risk. Factors for breast cancer? Cancer risk factors include: being female, increasing age, genetics, family history of breast cancer, previous breast cancer, being caucasian, dense breast tissue, some previous benign breast conditions, never having given birth or 1st child after age 30, early menarche, late menopause, radiation (chest), exposure to diethylstilbestrol, hormone replacement after >. Read more...

Should I be concerned having sisters with breast cancer that is non hereditary type bc?

Not concerned.... ... But alert. How do you know that your sisters' cancers did not have an inherited component? Were they seen by a geneticist? If you have several sisters with breast cancer, i think it would be proper that you be seen by a specialist it inherited cancers for an evaluation regarding risk assessment and possible genetic testing. Best to you. Read more...

Should I be concerned if I have a family history of breast cancer?

Yes. A family history of breast cancer significantly increases the risk to other family members. A geneticist or an oncologist can give an idea of how much risk there is to family members, and suggest surveillance strategies and possibly treatment alternatives. Read more...
Hereditary cancer. You should see your gynecologist or primary care physician to determine the strength of your family history. Read more...
Maybe. First degree relatives (mother, sister, daughter) of patients with breast cancer are at increased risk for developing cancer. More distant relatives have a risk similar to that of us population. Read more...
Yes. If you have a close relative with breast cancer, you will be at higher risk. An oncologist can help you determine that risk. Read more...
Depends On Risk. Most women overestimate their family risk of breast cancer--85-90% of breast ca cases are not hereditary. If your mother, sister, or daughter had breast (or ovarian) ca, esp before age 40, this warrants further evaluation. This is best determined by genetic counseling followed by brca testing (the gene responsible for many hereditary breast cancers), ideally starting w/affected family members. Read more...