Is radiation and chemotherapy the only way to get rid of vaginal cancer?

It depends... Vaginal cancer treatment can depend on size of tumor and whether or not it is suspected to have spread to lymph nodes or other sites in the pelvis. If it is caught early enough and once the pathologist reports on the extent of disease, you should talk with your gyn-oncologist on appropriate, specific treatment for you.
Depends. Usually chemoradiation is the way to go. Surgery can potentially play a role depending on the details of the tumor. Here is a good resource on vaginal cancer. http://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/vaginal-cancer.

Related Questions

Do you necessarily have to go through chemotherapy if you have vaginal cancer?

No, depends. You should be seeing a gyn-oncologist, but it depends on the severity and size of the vaginal cancer. Typically, radiation may be necessary, again it depends on the severity and size as determined by initial surgery for removal and staging of the cancer. Read more...
Vaginal Cancer Rx. Not necessarily. It depends in the cancer stage - how far the tumor has invaded and spread to adjacent tissues and/ or distant sits. Your oncology team is best suited to make that determination. Sometimes surgery is sufficient; other times radiation therapy is recommended. In higher stage disease, surgery is often combined with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Read more...

What effects might myasthenia graves have on radiation and chemotherapy treatment for pancreatic cancer?

See prior answer. In brief, anesthesia, neuromuscular blockers, surgery itself can all result in post-operative respiratory failure, with need for trach and respirator. The chemo may also affect the neuromuscular junction. Need a careful coordinated team approach with your neurologist constantly monitoring. Read more...

What foods should I eat while taking radiation for vaginal cancer, also what are the best drinks to drink?

We're not sure. While we know that a person's diet does influence their overall health we do not really know whether certain foods are "better" than others during radiation treatment. In general, as the organs in the pelvis (including rectum and bowel) will be included in your treatment and this could result in some diarrhea we often suggest a low fiber diet so as to not worsen any possible diarrhea. Read more...
Depends on symptoms. Treatment with radiation towards the pelvis may have effects on the bowel. If diarrhea develops we suggest a low fiber diet. If a patient becomes fatigued we try decreasing carbohydrates and increasing protein. For most a balanced nutritious diet with variety works fine. All of this is tempered to not change a diet for a diabetic or other specialized diets when needed. Read more...

Is it true that gardasil will prevent vaginal cancer?

Risk reduction. The gardsil vaccine will reduce the risk (but not prevent all cases) of cancer associated with the high-risk hpv viruses. This includes cancer of the vaginal, cervix, vulva, and anus. Read more...
Yes. Cervarix is another vacination against hpv 16 & 18 , gardiasil protect against hpv 16 & 18, also 6 & 11. 16 & 18 are associated with cervical, vaginal, vulvar cancer. 6 & 11 more associated with genital wart (not necessary cervical cancer). Cervarix seems to be more potent thant gardiasil for prevention of cancer (still both are very good). Get either one. Read more...

If I get radiation and chemotherapy for my esophageal cancer and have clean CT and pet scans, will I still need surgery?

Maybe. Therapy for esophageal cancer is dependent on the stage. There are IV relative stages. In the physically fit patient, the upfront therapy for stage i and iia is surgery. For stages iib and iii, the therapy of choice is chemoradiation followed by surgery. For stage iv, chemotherapy +/- radiation and no surgery. That being said 15-20% have complete eradication of tumor after chemoradiation. Read more...
Possibly. That is the big- time question now. The only way to know the cancer is resected is to examine the specimen. Todays imaging studies will give some information, but are limited by post- therapy changes. Repeat biopsies only help if you identify the right area. Observation may be possible, but surgery gives more consistent results. Read more...

Pain in hips since radiation and chemotherapy for cervical cancer; does it go away?

More info needed. Bone pain in a cancer patient requires a careful search for metastatic desease. This may be a simple back strain, but it could be as serious as loss of circulation to the hip socket resulting in avn, see your physician , many questions are due to be answered. Read more...
Neuropathy. It can be related to neuropathy after chemotherapy and/or radiation. Often it does go away after several months. However, i would recommend to see pain specialist and start medical treatment. Read more...

What to do if I know radiation and chemotherapy are mainly for cancer but what is dialysis for?

Kidney failure. Dialysis replaces the function of the kidneys to filter byproducts out of your blood to create urine and avoid buildup of impurities in the blood. Read more...

How likely is it that I will survive lung cancer with just radiation and chemotherapy?

It is possible. Depends on the type of lung cancer. There are four types. It also depends on the stage of cancer. As the stage gets higher it is less likely or even impossible. Stage i for example is about 70 percent. Stage iiib is about 20 percent. Stage IV is not likely at all, though some long term reponders do exist. Read more...
For stage I and II. For stage i and ii lung cancer, the standard of care is anatomic surgical resection. This potentiall can be done minimally invasively. Read more...
Need a lot more info. To properly address your question, we need to first distinguish whether one is diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer versus small cell lung cancer. The next question is what is the stage of the disease. Stage IV non-small cell and extensive stage small cell lung cancer are not considered curable lung cancers. The goal of treatment in these cases is to shrink the tumors and control symptoms. Read more...