How can I transition from breast milk to formula?

For most people... ...The question is moot -- they either stop lactating, or start a medication that is incompatible with breast feeding, and go straight to formula. Abrupt change does not seem to be any worse than any gradual change, as far as chances of formula causing a reaction. Breast is best, of course, but when you have to stop, there is no problem if you stop at once.
Some fast, some slow. Some children transition very easily from breast milk to formula. Others need a little "persuasion." once their used to drinking breast milk from a bottle or cup, replace a little of the breast milk with formula, slowly increasing the formula and decreasing the breast milk over days/weeks. Sort of "sneaking" the taste of it in on them. Usually works if you don't go too fast.

Related Questions

How can my 4m old baby transition from breast milk to formula? She's tried many and just won't take any and bottles are not the problem.

Weaning from breast . If you are willing to pump your own breast milk & freeze it for daily use sine the baby is refusing to drink any formula, other wise you just have to keep trying until the baby gets used to one of the formulas, very soon you will be introducing sold food & that will help but you still need to offer formula or pumped breast milk. Good luck. Read more...

1 month old baby. Switching from breast milk to formula. Poop is super runny and a mossy green. Is this normal? I myself have run out of breast milk

Poop. Your baby's stool may be green from the iron in formula. The stools may be runny for a few days as he makes the transition from breast milk to formula. If poop remains runny he may need a formula change. Read more...

I just switched my 3 month old from breast milk to formula. It's been 2 days and he hasn't had a bowel movement. When should I be concerned?

When it hurts. Bowel movement frequency varies tremendously. If the baby is in no pain, and when the bm eventually comes it's soft and painless, then don't let it worry you. If, however, it's painful, hard, or there is a change in how much the baby feeds, see your pediatrician. Read more...

Is formula as nutritious as breast milk?

No. Formula is a close second to breast milk. There are many nutrients in breast milk that can not be "copied" and each mom's breast milk is ideally suited for her baby. Approved infant formulas do contain all the known nutrients that a baby needs to grow and stay healthy and should be used for the first year when breast milk can not be used. Read more...
No. In almost all cases, breastmilk is best. Baby humans are made to drink human milk. Formulas do a good job of imitating breastmilk. In a few cases, a mom's milk may have some unusual imbalance of ingredients (for example, not enough fat, or more salt than usual), or a mom may be on a medication that gets into her milk and is harmful to babies. In these cases, formula would be more "nutritious". Read more...

Is it ok to mix breast milk and formula?

Yes. You can mix breast milk and formula at any time. This is helpful when trying to wean from breastfeeding before your baby is old enough to have whole milk. Do not use breast milk to mix in formula powder. Read more...
Yes. Sure. Just try to be sure you use just the amount of breast milk that you think your baby will need for the feeding as it should not be refrigerated or frozen again after it has been defrosted. It is not harmful to mix both together and feed the milk to your baby if you feel your baby needs more milk that you are able to provide for each feeding. Read more...

What does breast milk contain different than formula?

See below. 1. Immunoglobulin a which is responsible for the breast-fed infants to get less respiratory and gastrointestinal infection 2. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid...Enhancing neuronal development 3. Readily absorbable iron 4, pro- and prebiotics. Read more...

What number of ingredients in breast milk aren't found in formula?

See below. Immunoglobulin A, Pro- and prebiotics, and Lactoferrin are the ones of clinical importance, i.e., protection from different infections. Read more...