Related Questions

What is foot drop, how is it treated/managed. Diabetic neuropathy and diabetic vascular disease?

Neuro-muscular. Foot drop is a manifestation of neuromuscular disorder from many causes, including, vitamin deficiency, lead poisoning, leprosy, alcoholism etc. You may consult this site for more info. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/foot-drop/basics/causes/con-20032918. Read more...
WHY? First, find the etiology/reason for the drop foot. You're so young to have PVD and neuropathy. Maybe a NCV and EMG. Then, start w/ some type of bracing before surgery. Read more...

What is diabetic neuropathy?

Foot ulceration. Diabetics have loss of protective sensation to their feet. This occurs because excess glucose in the blood causes pathological changes to the nerves. Poor sensation can lead to the development of sores or ulcers. Diabetic also have poor blood supply to their feet so it is difficult to heal the ulcers. The ulcers can get infected and cause gangrene of the foot. Read more...
A nerve problem. Neuropathy can actually happen in different people for different reasons. It happens to be a common problem associated with diabetes. It is usually a sensory impairment where the individual complains of burning, numbness, tingling, stabbing, shooting generally of hands and or feet. Read more...
Pain, numbness. . When diabetics have uncontrolled blood sugars their nerves pay the price over time. They can have tingling, burning, and numbness, and once it happens it's impossible to get normal sensation back. Some medications reduce the tingling, but nothing can reverse numbness. Read more...
Nerver disfunction. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from a numbness and tingling sensation, possibly a burning sensation, to an uncomfortable painful sensation of the extremities. Neuropathy may affect your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and the heart. For some people, the symptoms are mild; for others, it can be painful and disabling. Read more...
Diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. The common symptoms are numbness or tingling of the extremity. Read more...

Can diabetic neuropathy be cured?

Acetyl l carnitine. The only thing with evidence to suggest it may be able to help nerve recovery in diabetic neuropathy is acetyl l carnitine. It is a safe over the counter Amino Acid supplement that is proven to alleviate symtpoms and may aid in nerve regeneration. Read more...
No. However it can improved with medications such as Gabapentin or Lyrica (pregabalin) and occasionally with improved control of the diabetes. Read more...
Some times. If you are treating a particular nutritional deficiency, metanx may be of benefit. Neuropathy can be due to certain vitamin deficiencies, nerve damage due to trauma, alcohol consumption, side effects of certain medications, or due to certain medical conditions such as diabetes. Treatment varies depending on the cause of the problem. Have it evaluated and appropriately treated. Read more...
Diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy has no known cure. Fortunately, there are treatments for diabetic neuropathy. The treatment mainly focuses on slowing progression of the disease, relieving pain, and restoring function. Read more...

How common is diabetic neuropathy?

Very. With the increase in the number of diabetics neuropathy will continue to rise.. Read more...
Common. Amongst the diabetic population. Keeping strict glycemic control can help ward off. Read more...
Very common. . Unfortunately. When diabetics have uncontrolled blood sugars their nerves pay the price over time. They can have tingling, burning, and numbness, and once it happens it's impossible to get normal sensation back. Some medications reduce the tingling, but nothing can reverse numbness. Read more...
Very common. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from a numbness and tingling sensation, possibly a burning sensation, to an uncomfortable painful sensation of the extremities. Neuropathy may affect your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and the heart. For some people, the symptoms are mild; for others, it can be painful and disabling. Read more...

What exactly is diabetic neuropathy?

See below. Diabetic neuropathy is a common condition in persons with diabetes. The exact cause is not known but may be due to the toxic effects of high circulating blood sugar or due to problems with the blood supply to the nerves. Typically this starts in the feet with numbness or pain which progresses up the legs. It may then involve the hands. It can involve the nerves coming out of the spine as well. Read more...
Sensory, motor, Auto. Sensory neuropathy is broken down into large fiber (loss of sensation, loss of proprioception) and small fiber (burning, tingling sensation). Most patient’s state the numbness starts at the tips of the toes and slowly works it way up the legs. Motor neuropathy causes gait instability and deformities of the feet. Lastly autonomic neuropathy effects include stomach emptying and erectile dysfunction. Read more...
Diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. The common symptoms are numbness or tingling of the extremity. Read more...

What is done for diabetic neuropathy?

Get evaluated. If the symptoms are due to neuropathy, topical capsaicin may be helpful for some, while others may benefit with oral medications. Watch you sugar intake, and have your vitamin b levels checked and supplemented as necessary. Consult with your physician for an appropriate plan of care. Read more...
Diabetic neuropathy. The best treatment for diabetic neuropathy is keeping blood sugar within a narrow target range. It can be done through healthy-eating plan, physical activity, maintaining healthy weight, stop smoking and avoid alcohol. For pain from diabetic neuropathy, anti-seizure medication, antidepressant medication, and topical cream (capsaicin) seem to be effective. Read more...

Could diabetic neuropathy be reversed?

Great question!! You have entered into the frontiers of medicine, and briefly, we do have a prescription medical food, metanx, which has been biopsy proven to restore density of small fiber loss in diabetes. There is also some data to suggest better outcomes with very strict blood sugar control.. In europe, there are a few drugs which seem to offer further promise, but not yet on usa market. Read more...
YES. Yes, if it's early. The best way to "reverse" it is strict blood glucose control via A1C monitoring. Read more...

How to tell if I have diabetic neuropathy?

Filament testing. There is a standardized test using a small monofiliment that is touched to the skin. Your podiatrist or internest can do this test for you to test for lack of skin sensation in different areas, usually in the feet. Read more...
Get tested. Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range anywhere from a numbness and tingling sensation, possibly a burning sensation, to an uncomfortable painful sensation of the extremities. For some, these symptoms are mild, while for others, they can be severe and disabling. Have you physician examine and test you to determine if you have developed neuropathy so that you may prevent possible complications. Read more...
Pain, numbness. . When diabetics have uncontrolled blood sugars their nerves pay the price over time. They can have tingling, burning, and numbness, and once it happens it's impossible to get normal sensation back. Some medications reduce the tingling, but nothing can reverse numbness. Read more...
Take this home test: Test each foot with the Ipswich test: Compared to the standard monofilament test, it was able to detect neuropathy("positive test") in 3 out of 4 patients. If the test is normal("negative") it's unlikely you have neuropathy. Lightly touch the tips of 1st, 3rd & 5th toe for 1 second. Loss of sensation in two or more toes = neuropathy. SEE: bit.ly/1vsGZXn. Read more...