22 doctors weighed in:

Are antibiotics effective for treating athlete’s foot?

22 doctors weighed in
Dr. Karen Han
Dermatology
6 doctors agree

In brief: No

Antibiotics target bacteria.
Athletes foot is a fungal infection, which responds to antifungals.

In brief: No

Antibiotics target bacteria.
Athletes foot is a fungal infection, which responds to antifungals.
Dr. Karen Han
Dr. Karen Han
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Dr. Cecily Kelly
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

Antibiotics are for bacterial infections.
To treat athlete's foot you need an antifungal medication. The other thing is that fungus is a very slow growing organism, so in order to treat it you have to treat it for an extended period of time.

In brief: No

Antibiotics are for bacterial infections.
To treat athlete's foot you need an antifungal medication. The other thing is that fungus is a very slow growing organism, so in order to treat it you have to treat it for an extended period of time.
Dr. Cecily Kelly
Dr. Cecily Kelly
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Dr. Martin Bress
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

Athlete's foot is a fungal infection and requires special medication usually applied directly to the involved toes.
Only if secondary bacterial infection develops (uncommon) would antibiotics be advised.

In brief: No

Athlete's foot is a fungal infection and requires special medication usually applied directly to the involved toes.
Only if secondary bacterial infection develops (uncommon) would antibiotics be advised.
Dr. Martin Bress
Dr. Martin Bress
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Dr. Scott Williamson
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

Athlete's foot is caused by a fungus and needs to be treated with an anti-fungal agent.
Anti-fungals are available over the counter and by prescription. It really helps to keep your feet dry, especially the area between your fourth and fifth toes.

In brief: No

Athlete's foot is caused by a fungus and needs to be treated with an anti-fungal agent.
Anti-fungals are available over the counter and by prescription. It really helps to keep your feet dry, especially the area between your fourth and fifth toes.
Dr. Scott Williamson
Dr. Scott Williamson
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Dr. Adam Teichman
Orthopedic Surgery - Foot & Ankle

In brief: No

Antibiotics are used to treat bacteria and athletes foot is a fungus.
Usually topical agents are used to treat athletes feet. If the symptoms are not improving sometimes an oral antifungal agent can be used. Contact a medical specialist if your symptoms do not resolve or worsen.

In brief: No

Antibiotics are used to treat bacteria and athletes foot is a fungus.
Usually topical agents are used to treat athletes feet. If the symptoms are not improving sometimes an oral antifungal agent can be used. Contact a medical specialist if your symptoms do not resolve or worsen.
Dr. Adam Teichman
Dr. Adam Teichman
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Dr. Mary Ann Block
General Practice

In brief: No

Athletes foot is a fungus.
Antibiotics can make a fungus worse. However, if the athletes foot has caused a secondary bacterial infection, antibiotics may be necessary.

In brief: No

Athletes foot is a fungus.
Antibiotics can make a fungus worse. However, if the athletes foot has caused a secondary bacterial infection, antibiotics may be necessary.
Dr. Mary Ann Block
Dr. Mary Ann Block
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Dr. Kenneth Adler
Family Medicine

In brief: No

Athelete's foot is a fungal infection.
Antibiotics are for treating bacterial infections. Antifungal medicines like terbenafine (lamisil), Clotrimazole (lotrimin), etc. Are effective in treating athlete's foot. A couple of weeks of treatment is common.

In brief: No

Athelete's foot is a fungal infection.
Antibiotics are for treating bacterial infections. Antifungal medicines like terbenafine (lamisil), Clotrimazole (lotrimin), etc. Are effective in treating athlete's foot. A couple of weeks of treatment is common.
Dr. Kenneth Adler
Dr. Kenneth Adler
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Dr. Lorne Bigley
Family Medicine

In brief: No

Antiobiotics fight infections caused by bacteria.
Antifungals fight infections caused by fungus. Athletes foot is caused by a fungus that is best treated with an antifungal, like Lamisil (terbinafine) or lotrimin.

In brief: No

Antiobiotics fight infections caused by bacteria.
Antifungals fight infections caused by fungus. Athletes foot is caused by a fungus that is best treated with an antifungal, like Lamisil (terbinafine) or lotrimin.
Dr. Lorne Bigley
Dr. Lorne Bigley
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Dr. Visalakshi Vallury
Family Medicine

In brief: No

Athlete's foot is caused by a fungus and antibiotics (which treat bacterial infections) are not effective unless there is a secondary bacterial infection.
Even with a secondary infection, antibiotics will not treat the underlying fungal infection. You should see your physician to determine the appropriate treatment.

In brief: No

Athlete's foot is caused by a fungus and antibiotics (which treat bacterial infections) are not effective unless there is a secondary bacterial infection.
Even with a secondary infection, antibiotics will not treat the underlying fungal infection. You should see your physician to determine the appropriate treatment.
Dr. Visalakshi Vallury
Dr. Visalakshi Vallury
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Dr. Nicholas Nomicos
General Practice

In brief: No

Athlete's foot is a fungal infection so antibiotics don't help.
Athlete's foot, or tinea pedis, is the most common type of fungal infection and is best treated with over-the-counter antifungal medication.

In brief: No

Athlete's foot is a fungal infection so antibiotics don't help.
Athlete's foot, or tinea pedis, is the most common type of fungal infection and is best treated with over-the-counter antifungal medication.
Dr. Nicholas Nomicos
Dr. Nicholas Nomicos
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Dr. Dean Giannone
Internal Medicine

In brief: No

Athletes' foot is a fungal infection of the foot, not a bacterial infection, and as such will not respond to antibiotics.
Antifungal medications are required for athletes' foot.

In brief: No

Athletes' foot is a fungal infection of the foot, not a bacterial infection, and as such will not respond to antibiotics.
Antifungal medications are required for athletes' foot.
Dr. Dean Giannone
Dr. Dean Giannone
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Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
Family Medicine

In brief: No

Athletes foot is a fungal infection (tinea pedis).
Antifungal creams , such as Lamisil (terbinafine) are effective in most cases. When the area between the toes is macerated (moist and peeling), there may be a secondary bacterial infection, so sometimes an antibiotic is used.

In brief: No

Athletes foot is a fungal infection (tinea pedis).
Antifungal creams , such as Lamisil (terbinafine) are effective in most cases. When the area between the toes is macerated (moist and peeling), there may be a secondary bacterial infection, so sometimes an antibiotic is used.
Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
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Dr. Theodore Caspe
Family Medicine

In brief: No

Its called an antifungal.
Most of the time we try to use topical medications first. Oral meds have side effects on the liver. So liver tests should be done before starting and while on the medication.

In brief: No

Its called an antifungal.
Most of the time we try to use topical medications first. Oral meds have side effects on the liver. So liver tests should be done before starting and while on the medication.
Dr. Theodore Caspe
Dr. Theodore Caspe
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Dr. Rebecca Tennant
Family Medicine

In brief: No

Antibiotics work against bacteria, not fungi.

In brief: No

Antibiotics work against bacteria, not fungi.
Dr. Rebecca Tennant
Dr. Rebecca Tennant
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Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine

In brief: No

Although technically no (as antibiotics only go after bacterial infections), there are anti-fungal agents (creams and pills) that go after fungal infections.
Although this can be treated with over the counter creams, it is advisable to consult with your physician to confirm the diagnosis and to make sure there is not a secondary infection occurring.

In brief: No

Although technically no (as antibiotics only go after bacterial infections), there are anti-fungal agents (creams and pills) that go after fungal infections.
Although this can be treated with over the counter creams, it is advisable to consult with your physician to confirm the diagnosis and to make sure there is not a secondary infection occurring.
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Thank
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