Can your heart beat 300 beats per minute and you still live?

Yes. Yes it can but not for long (at rest). The heart will quickly tire. In addition, the body will not be getting adequate blood flow and oxygen. This needs to be corrected right away if it doesn't immediately self-correct because it can degrade into a potentially fatal rhythm.

Related Questions

Rapid heart beat my daughter, who is 11 years old, has occasional dramatic increases in her heart rate (once or twice a week). I taught her how to count her beats per minute and today her pulse jumped to 240 for about 5 minutes (per her account). Her norm

Your . Your description of her symptoms is very alarming. This is clearly not a normal finding. She needs to see her pediatrician or family physician soon. They may refer her to a pediatric cardiologist. Please don't put this off. Read more...
Needs workup. That's definitely abnormal and potentially dangerous. Get her seen, please. She likely has supraventricular tachycardia, but could have a more ominous condition, wolfe-parkinson-white syndrome which is associated with sudden death. That aside, if she has heart rates of 240, she could pass out, fall down, and hurt herself. Read more...

How many beats per minute should the heart beat?

Depends. Our heart works to provide adequate blood flow, usually described in liters/min.To reach this value the heart ejects a certain volume with each beat, known as the stroke volume (sv described as ml/beat). This is multiplied by the heart rate (beats/minute) to yield a volume per minute. The blood flow needed depends on what you are doing, sleeping requires alot less than exercise.The rate will vary. Read more...

What do you suggest if my heart rate dropped to 40 beats per minute the other day. How low can your heart beat drop?

Much slower. Your heart rate can pause for up to 5 seconds (that's a heart rate of 12) and, depending on what you're doing, you may not notice it. Depending on your activity and position, or if it's happening regularly, you'll pass out (or nearly pass out). Read more...

I took mdma and my resting heart beat is 108 beats per minute, is that normal or should I get the the hospital?

A bit late. I expect you've either returned to normal or went to an ER - but in any case - this is a definite sign that you should NOT use it again. It's a risky drug and for the pro(s) there are bigger con(s). Have fun, but be safe. Read more...
Advice. Contact a doctor, as your resting heart rate is too fast, but am more concerned about your ingesting a potentially harmful agent. I would suggest changing your path ASAP, and counseling with rehabilitation could vastly improve your future. Read more...

Why does my heart speed up when I stand up? My heart has been acting strange lately. When I am seated my heart beat is normal, around 60 beats per minute. But when I stand it jumps to around 100 bpm. Should I be worried about this?

When . When a person stands up it is normal for the heart rate to transiently increase, but in your case this jump in heart rate is a bit more than expected. You may be dehydrated. When sitting, blood pools in the legs. When a person stands, the heart and blood vessels act in a coordinated way to compensate against gravity and maintain adequate blood flow to the brain. When adequately hydrated, this is easy for the heart to accomplish and the change in heart rate is minimal. If a person is dehydrated, a larger percentage of their blood is pooled in the legs and the upper body blood vessels are relatively depleted. The "tank is empty" so to speak. In this circumstance it is harder for the heart to compensate for the standing, and in order to maintain an adequate amount of blood flow, the heart has to speed up. Try increasing your fluid intake and avoid excessive caffeine or alcohol, both of which act as diuretics. If your symptoms do not improve, see your doctor for further evaluation. Read more...

86 beats per minute heart rate, yet I breathe like I ran and my heart beat is loud. My body is shaking, I have dry cough and blocked nose with mucus.

Hard breathing. Blockage of nasal passages with harder breathing can make the heart work harder which means more forceful beat and faster heart rate with exertion. Are your nasal passages blocked because of allergies or because of infection? You may need a course of antibiotics if you have a sinus infection. Read more...