Benefits and risks of low-dose aspirin?

Aspirin therapy. Low dose Aspirin has been shown to be of benefit as secondary prevention (preventing second events) in people who have suffered heart attacks or strokes. It is also of benefit as primary prevention (preventing first events) in patients with cardiovascular risk factors though it's use should be balanced by a slightly increased risk of bleeding and gastric irritation.

Related Questions

If low dose aspirin is beneficial, would the dose need to be increased to get the same benefit for someone living at 10, 000 feet in altitude?

No. altitude does not decrease the efficacy of low dose aspirin as anti platelet agent. As the name its interprets " low dose" Aspirin. So Aspirin anti platelet activity is not dose dependent nor altitudes make a difference. . Read more...
No change needed. There is no data that would suggest changing the dose of ASA from low dose to higher dose due to altitude changes. Read more...

Is it ok to take low dose aspirin on your own.

Consult with a doc. It's not recommended to start taking Aspirin without consulting with a doctor. Depending on your age, gender, and number of cardiovascular risk factors, your doctor may prescribe or recommend daily Aspirin for prevention of heart disease or stroke. Read more...

I have a low patelets count should I take low dose aspirin?

Depends. Depends on the degree, if you are at risk for heart disease or stroke and if you are at risk (for any other reason) for uncontrolled bleeding. Sometimes the cause of low platelets should be identified and treated if the benefits of aspirin therapy warrant it. Need to discuss with your physician. Read more...

Will taking a low dose aspirin once a day protect from hear attack?

HEART HEALTH. Aspirin helps thin the blood by a complex biochemical mechanism. The fact is that a heart attack is usually caused from a crack in a cholesterol laden plaque in one of the arteries that feeds the heart muscle. The aspirin, taken regularly, helps prevent the clot from developing and buys the patient time. It doesn't prevent the plaque rupture, but it delays the blockage that the ensuing clot causes. Read more...