5 doctors weighed in:
Does a dermatologist treat shingles, or should I see my family doctor?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. Tony Willson
Family Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: Family doctor
While your family doctor is more than qualified to treat shingles as mentioned in an earlier post, it is important to note that if you develop shingles that involve the eye you may want to request to be seen by an opthalmologist as well.
One recent study published in 2010 actually found those who had ocular (eye) shingles had a 4 fold increase risk of having a stroke in the future.

In brief: Family doctor
While your family doctor is more than qualified to treat shingles as mentioned in an earlier post, it is important to note that if you develop shingles that involve the eye you may want to request to be seen by an opthalmologist as well.
One recent study published in 2010 actually found those who had ocular (eye) shingles had a 4 fold increase risk of having a stroke in the future.
Dr. Tony Willson
Dr. Tony Willson
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Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: Family doctor
A family doctor is perfectly qualified to diagnose & treat shingles.
If there are complications or the diagnosis is not clear for some reason, a specialist like a dermatologist may be helpful but this is not common.

In brief: Family doctor
A family doctor is perfectly qualified to diagnose & treat shingles.
If there are complications or the diagnosis is not clear for some reason, a specialist like a dermatologist may be helpful but this is not common.
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Dr. Ankush Bansal
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Dr. M. Christine Lee
Dermatology
In brief: Yes
Dermatologists treat shingles.
There is no cure but treatment can shorten the length of the illness and prevent complications. Antivirals (ie: acyclovir, valacyclovir, famciclovir) are given to reduce the duration and pain of shingles. Pain meds, antidepressants, topical creams can also help relieve long-term pain.

In brief: Yes
Dermatologists treat shingles.
There is no cure but treatment can shorten the length of the illness and prevent complications. Antivirals (ie: acyclovir, valacyclovir, famciclovir) are given to reduce the duration and pain of shingles. Pain meds, antidepressants, topical creams can also help relieve long-term pain.
Dr. M. Christine Lee
Dr. M. Christine Lee
Thank
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