8 doctors weighed in:

My twin girls just turned one. One nurses mainly when she's tired and the other anytime I offer. How do I tell if they nurse for comfort or nutrition?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Randy Baker
Holistic Medicine
6 doctors agree

In brief: Looks like you know

It sounds from your description that the one who nurses when she's tired is nursing mostly for comfort while the other needs the nutrition.
I don't know other ways to tell for sure. But i see nothing wrong with nursing for comfort; to me this is just as valid a reason for nursing as to supply nutrition.

In brief: Looks like you know

It sounds from your description that the one who nurses when she's tired is nursing mostly for comfort while the other needs the nutrition.
I don't know other ways to tell for sure. But i see nothing wrong with nursing for comfort; to me this is just as valid a reason for nursing as to supply nutrition.
Dr. Randy Baker
Dr. Randy Baker
Thank
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral

In brief: Recommended age

for weaning is as close to a year as possible.
Wean to an open-mouth cup to promote lip closure for speech. Limit milk & milk products to 16-21 oz/day. Brush their teeth after feeding or nursing before they go to sleep. Their first visit to a pediatric dentist is due now. Once they are 15 mos. developmentally, they will protest longer & louder than if you wean now, but the choice is yours.

In brief: Recommended age

for weaning is as close to a year as possible.
Wean to an open-mouth cup to promote lip closure for speech. Limit milk & milk products to 16-21 oz/day. Brush their teeth after feeding or nursing before they go to sleep. Their first visit to a pediatric dentist is due now. Once they are 15 mos. developmentally, they will protest longer & louder than if you wean now, but the choice is yours.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Randy Baker
In reviewing authorities such as the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), World Health Organization & La Leche League, none of them recommend "weaning as close to a year as possible." The AAP advises "Breastfeeding should be continued for at least the first year of life and beyond for as long as mutually desired by mother and child." See http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=42463
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Most recent AAP recommendation. is by 15 mos. but if nursing, you " can continue if you want to", as I stated in my answer. I give parents facts about behavioral changes at different ages so they can make an informed decisions. 15-month-olds can be as set in their ways as little old ladies or little old men.
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