Related Questions

Can you tell me about non-small cell lung cancer?

Not enough space. Let's see: most common category of lung cancer, often but not always tobacco related, treated with surgery if possible but radiation and chemo are often used as well. I suggest you visit the national cancer institute website. It's has good info regarding all kinds of cancers. Read more...

Is non-small cell lung cancer often a non-smokers cancer?

Yes. The two variants of lung cancer that are non small cell (neuroendocrine) in origin are squamous and adenoCa of the lung. In the last decade, the squamous variant has taken a back seat and adenoCa unrelated to smoking has occupied more than 70% of the cases. The probable cause is a viral factor. Read more...
Yes. There are several types of non-small cell lung cancer. Typically squamous cell is associated with smoking. Adenocarcinoma isn't usually related to smoking. Read more...

Can you tell me about the difference in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer?

Treated differently. Non small cell cancer refers to any lung cancer that is not small cell. Small cell lung cancer is a subset of all lung cancer that is typically very responsive to chemotherapy, so it is important to know the type of lung cancer to determine the best treatment. Read more...

Can any doc tell me what's the difference in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer?

Cells and treatment. The cell types and treatment is the biggest issues. Non small cell are adeno, large and squamous cell types. Each have an association with smoking but not always. Treatment is the same. First if possible resection +/- chemo/radiation. Cure can be resection. Small cell=smoking. Can be limitted or extensive. Responds well to chemo. Grows faster, mostly treatable not cureable. Need to talk to ur md! Read more...

What is non-small cell lung cancer?

One type . There are two broad categories of primary lung cancer called small cell and non small cell. Simply put, small cell is more aggressive, harder to treat and less common. Non small cell acts differently, can be treated with surgery and is the common smokers lung cancer. Read more...
See below. Non-small cell lung cancer is a type of lung cancer that grows more slowly and can be operated on if diagnosed at an early stage. It generally has a better prognosis than small-cell lung cancer, but that is depending on the stage and comorbidities. Read more...
Formerly, NSCLC . (sq & adeno) were treated with surgery, no chemo. Small cell was almost never treated with surgery and always chemotherapy. Now, chemotherapy is used in both. Once mediastinal nodes are +, chemo+rt is the standard, but many try to use surgery, especially if a lobectomy can be done. All are linked to smoking/tobacco. Read more...

Can people survive non small cell lung cancer?

Yes,depends stage. Stage 1 nsclc; surgical resection, appr70%5yrsurv stage2nsclc;surgery apprx. 30-35% 5 yr survival. Read more...

What are the tests for non-small cell lung cancer?

Work Up. Includes: ct-chest thru liver and adrenals, head ct+/- contrast or mr, bone scan. Pet scan depends on ct findings, proximity of primary to medistinum. Read more...
Nsclc. First of all, a biopsy will need to be done to the lung mass/nodule not only to establish diagnosis but also to find the histology and genetic profile of the cancer. Then, complete staging work-up with pet/ ct scan need to be done to stage the cancer. The treatment will depend on the histology/molecular-genetic mutation status, stage, as well as overall condition and preference of a patient. Read more...
A few. Ct scan and pet scan are sensitive radiographic test. Percutaneous biopsy can provide a diagnosis. In some high risk patients with suspicious radiographs going straight to surgical resection is reasonable. Read more...

What's the prognosis for non small cell lung cancer?

5yr suvival bystage . Ia = 49% ib = 45% iia = 30% iib = 31% iiia = 14% iiib = 5% iv = 1% http://www.Cancer.Org/cancer/lungcancer-non-smallcell/detailedguide/non-small-cell-lung-cancer-survival-rates. Read more...
Stage. As noted by other physician, there are statistical based survival estimates by stage. But, each patient is an individual. It is most critical to speak with your cancer team. They will develop multi-disciplan approach and treatment plan and have a more personalized/individualized determination of reasonable prognosis. Read more...
See below. No way to say based on the your question. We would need to know what stage, molecular markers, what type, etc. Read more...