Pain behind knee cap. Bulging foot veins. Leg hurts when pressure applied. Cramping in calf and thigh. Neg ddimer and ultrasound. What could it be?

Chondromalac/compart. When knees develop early tendonitis change, there can be periods of flare where inflammation and pain can develop behind the kneecap due to cartilage tears. This is also called patellar chondromalacia.There is also concern for compartment syndrome given your vascular complaints. It is thus best to see a Sports Medicine &/or Vascular MD to diagnose what is going on and make sure of the diagnosis.

Related Questions

Would MRI without contrast find DVT? I've had back of knee and calf pain. D-dimer and ultrasound came back normal, but veins in feet&leg are bulging.

No. with these normal studies there is no reason to pursue this issue...your problem sounds like non-truncal veins. Read more...
No.. The best test to reveal a DVT would be the ultrasound of the veins in your legs. The bulging veins in your legs are maybe varicose or spider veins - though you seem young for it. Sometimes, pregnancy can predispose to it however. . Read more...
CT Venogram. can be done of the lower extremity to determine if clot exists if ultrasound and d dimer are negative. Read more...

Foot is blue leg is cold up to the knee cap pin and needles in my foot I can see spiderweb veins in leg foot and calf swollen. Sprained one month ago?

Get it checked ASAP. Two possibilities come to mind. If you have a blood clot in your calf, your leg could look like that. Have it checked out immediately, because blood clots can go to the lungs. If it is not a blood clot, it could be CRPS (complex regional pain syndrome). This also needs to be seen soon as it can turn into a major pain problem. Read more...

I am having Knee pain from the top of the knee cap that radiates down to the ankle and up to the thigh on the right leg ice is not helping?

Try Advil/Aleve. This problem introduces the phenomenon of 'referred pain'. Usually with this the origin is fairly localizable. As the intensity of the pain increases so does the zone of perceived involvement. This presentation of severe knee pain is not uncommon. Note that this is unlikely to be sciatica. The quadriceps tendon traverses the top of the patella. One possibility is this could be strained. Read more...

I've been having knee pain under my knee cap. It gets worse after I run and radiates down my leg to my foot. What could this be?

Knee pain. Prepatella tendonitis is a possibility. An orthopedic surgeon is best to evaluate and treat you. Read more...
Chondromalacia. Pain under knee cap in someone your age is generally a knee cap cartilage problem . Can be from knee cap malalignment sometimes. If goes into leg and is associated with running , can be exertional compartment syndrome. Should be checked out. Read more...
Cartilage and fascia. Pain that feels like it is under the knee cap can come from worn cartilage, and also from the muscles and fascia on the inside of the thigh down toward the knee joint. To repair worn cartilage, learn to decrease your wear and tear, and increase speed of cartilage growth. For the muscles, feel for what is tender and massage it. www.blatmanhealthandwellness.com. Read more...

Pain bottom of foot. Calf and thigh cramping/knotting that wont go away. Could this be blood clot? I had a neg ultrasound knee to groin.

DVT. Hi, if your ultrasound is negative then it's very unlikely to have blood clot in leg, most likely you have some sort of muscle tiredness and cramping due to overuse, trauma due to exercise, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance but most likely reason would be overuse of the muscles in leg. Read more...
Plantar Fascitis? Where exactly "on the bottom of the foot". If its the bottom of the heel you might have plantar fasciitis with concomitant Achilles tendon tightening which can cause cramping of the calf and lower thigh. I suggest seeing a Podiatrist and also getting a nerve conduction velocity test to check your nerves. Lastly to rule out blood clot an ultrasound of the lower leg should be performed. Read more...