19 doctors weighed in:
Is co-sleeping safe?
19 doctors weighed in

8 doctors agree
In brief: No
It is actually a major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome, not to mention rollover suffocation.

In brief: No
It is actually a major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome, not to mention rollover suffocation.
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
Thank
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
4 doctors agree
In brief: No
Young babies should not co-sleep with a parent, because people do not want to take the risk that a baby might get tangled up with the co-sleeping parent, the sheets, the blankets, the pillows, etc .
. . .; and cause a suffocation.

In brief: No
Young babies should not co-sleep with a parent, because people do not want to take the risk that a baby might get tangled up with the co-sleeping parent, the sheets, the blankets, the pillows, etc .
. . .; and cause a suffocation.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
Thank
Dr. Parham Gharagozlou
Internal Medicine - Sleep Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Co-sleeping
The best practice for a baby is sharing same sleep room but different sleep surfaces.
Like his own crib etc, make sure his bed has the standards to avoid sids. For younger kids co-sleeping will also cause another set of problems mainly with quality of sleep and psychiatric/psychological problems. Avoid if possible.

In brief: Co-sleeping
The best practice for a baby is sharing same sleep room but different sleep surfaces.
Like his own crib etc, make sure his bed has the standards to avoid sids. For younger kids co-sleeping will also cause another set of problems mainly with quality of sleep and psychiatric/psychological problems. Avoid if possible.
Dr. Parham Gharagozlou
Dr. Parham Gharagozlou
Thank
Dr. Jeffrey Min
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: No
Pediatricians do recommend co-sleeping (sleeping in the same bed) due to the increased risk of sids and suffocation (from rolling over a baby).
Sleeping in the same room in a bassinet or crib does decrease the risk of sids.

In brief: No
Pediatricians do recommend co-sleeping (sleeping in the same bed) due to the increased risk of sids and suffocation (from rolling over a baby).
Sleeping in the same room in a bassinet or crib does decrease the risk of sids.
Dr. Jeffrey Min
Dr. Jeffrey Min
Thank
Dr. Patricia Vuguin
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: No
It is not safe neither healthy for your baby, you or your spouse.

In brief: No
It is not safe neither healthy for your baby, you or your spouse.
Dr. Patricia Vuguin
Dr. Patricia Vuguin
Thank
Dr. Natalie Hodge
Pediatrics
In brief: Depends
We feel that co-sleeping baby and parents should have some precautions taken.
Put the baby on the outside of mom with a cosleeper next to the bed. Make sure the covers are light and will not cover the babies face. A light onsie is fine. NO alcohol or any sedating drug should be in the system of either parent! Breastfeeding reduces risk of SIDS, so we definitely encourage that!

In brief: Depends
We feel that co-sleeping baby and parents should have some precautions taken.
Put the baby on the outside of mom with a cosleeper next to the bed. Make sure the covers are light and will not cover the babies face. A light onsie is fine. NO alcohol or any sedating drug should be in the system of either parent! Breastfeeding reduces risk of SIDS, so we definitely encourage that!
Dr. Natalie Hodge
Dr. Natalie Hodge
Thank
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
In brief: Why we say "No"
50% of the ~4600 annual sudden unintended infant deaths in us are classified as sids.
A review of 59 infant deaths from suid/sids in new mexico between 2006-2010 revealed that 52% of the infants had been put to sleep in a non-supine position & 71% had been found on an unsafe sleep surface. A shared sleep surface was found in 50% of the cases. "back to sleep" has reduced the rate of sids by 50%.

In brief: Why we say "No"
50% of the ~4600 annual sudden unintended infant deaths in us are classified as sids.
A review of 59 infant deaths from suid/sids in new mexico between 2006-2010 revealed that 52% of the infants had been put to sleep in a non-supine position & 71% had been found on an unsafe sleep surface. A shared sleep surface was found in 50% of the cases. "back to sleep" has reduced the rate of sids by 50%.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
Dr. Jay Park
Pediatrics
In brief: No
Contrast to typical beds for adults, infants' bed should have a rather firm surface, and no soft pillow is allowed.
Co-sleeping is one of risk factors for "sudden infant death syndrome.".

In brief: No
Contrast to typical beds for adults, infants' bed should have a rather firm surface, and no soft pillow is allowed.
Co-sleeping is one of risk factors for "sudden infant death syndrome.".
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Park
Thank
Dr. Kevin Windisch
Pediatrics
In brief: No
The american academy of pediatrics has recommended against this for years.

In brief: No
The american academy of pediatrics has recommended against this for years.
Dr. Kevin Windisch
Dr. Kevin Windisch
Thank
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