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What are subfoveal leakages from neovascularizations?

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Stahl
Internal Medicine

In brief: Subfoveal leakage

The fovea is the center part of the macula of the eye responsible for the sharpest vision.
Neovascularization is the growth of new blood vessels. In the eye this is common with diabetes and macular degeneration among others. Both can be associated with retinal detachment. Discuss with your opthalmologist asap.

In brief: Subfoveal leakage

The fovea is the center part of the macula of the eye responsible for the sharpest vision.
Neovascularization is the growth of new blood vessels. In the eye this is common with diabetes and macular degeneration among others. Both can be associated with retinal detachment. Discuss with your opthalmologist asap.
Dr. James Stahl
Dr. James Stahl
Thank
Dr. Samuel Barone
Ophthalmology

In brief: Edema

The hallmark of wet amd is neovascularization, the formation of abnormal blood vessels that grow into the retina, usually from the underlying vascular tissue called the choroid.
These abnormal blood vessels are unstable and can bleed or leak fluid as swelling or edema. When this swelling occurs under the very center of the retina, the fovea, it is termed 'subfoveal leakage'.

In brief: Edema

The hallmark of wet amd is neovascularization, the formation of abnormal blood vessels that grow into the retina, usually from the underlying vascular tissue called the choroid.
These abnormal blood vessels are unstable and can bleed or leak fluid as swelling or edema. When this swelling occurs under the very center of the retina, the fovea, it is termed 'subfoveal leakage'.
Dr. Samuel Barone
Dr. Samuel Barone
Thank
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