What would be the first symptoms of colon or rectal cancer?

No symptoms. Unfortunately early colon and rectal cancer will present with no symptoms. This is why it is important to be screened at an appropriate e age. This typically begins at 50 yrs for normal risk individuals. Rectal bleeding can be a sign which is why this should be evaluated by your doctor if present.
None! Early symptoms of colon and rectal cancer do not exist. That is why screening tests are so important. Simple tests such as checking for blood in the stool can hep identify people at risk for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy is the gold standard for screening in the usa. Symptoms that may be caused by colorectal cancer include diarrhea, constipation, change in bowel habits and bleeding.
Usually none. The most common symptom in people diagnosed with colorectal cancer is no symptom at all; this is why screening is so important. Most common symptoms are change in bowel habits, weight loss, blood with stools, anemia- but these are late symptoms, and are associated with a poor outcome. Every american should be screened at age 50, sooner if a first-degree relative has had cr cancer or polyps.
None or bleeding. Most colon and rectal cancers have no symptoms until they either start bleeding (causing anemia - a low blood level), rupture open (perforate), or invade other tissues, causing pain. This is why screening colonoscopy -- to find cancers while they are small, and to remove polyps which grow up to become cancers -- is so important. Go get checked!

Related Questions

What are your first symptoms of colon/rectal cancer?

None. The first signs of colon cancer would be no symptoms at all. Later mild intestinal beeping can occur that is also not visible. Later colon blockage and anemia might occur. Read more...
None. Dont rely on symptoms. Colonoscopy is what to do. Bleeding is a common symptom, but is could be too late. Other could be pain, a mass, cosntipation, weight loss. None of them are specific for colon cancer. Don't wait for symptoms. The screening power of colonoscopy to prevent colon cancer is excellent. Get your colonoscopy. Read more...

Does everyone who gets colon or rectal cancer get polyps first?

Yes. The typical colon and rectal cancers, or adenocarcinomas, start as polyps. That's precisely why getting a screening colonoscopy by age 50 is so important. Read more...
Most do. Most colorectal cancers arise in adenomatous polyps, which are the type of polyps that are examined for and removed in colonoscopy. Data now shows that removal of colorectal polyps decreases coloretcal cancers as well as the risk of dying from a colorectal cancer. Less frequently, colorectal cancers can be founs that do not arise from polyps. This most often happens in inflammatory bowel disease. Read more...

If I have colon or rectal cancer that has spread to the liver, should I have chemotherapy first?

Depends. Some patients undergo resection first and some undergo chemotherapy. These decisions are best made in conjunction with your medical team (surgeon, oncologist). Read more...
Depends. There are too many variables to be able to give a succinct answer. Your team of physicians (oncologist, surgeon, primary care physician, etc.) collectively should be able to provide you with the best answer for your specific situation. Don't be afraid to ask questions. Read more...
Possibly. Different cancers (types) have different optimal treatment regimens. It may involve surgery in tandem with chemotherapy, radiation with chemo, or chemo only. You need to discuss your best options with your oncologist. Read more...
Find a good team. Colorectal cancer with spread to the liver is a hotly debated and controversial topic. Multiple variables include - the location of the tumor, the symptoms it is producing, the location of the liver mets and their potentail for surgical removal. You need an experienced team that deals with this commonly (surgical and medical oncologists, maybe rad onc, as well). Good ct/pet is vital. Read more...
Usually yes. Unless you have an impending obstruction or severe bleeding from the colorectal tumor, chemotherapy is generally the best way to start. Starting with an operation often delays the time until you can start getting the chemo. Surgery is effective for the bowel, but does nothing to address the liver disease. Chemo also kills tumor cells in your blood stream that can lead to tumors in other organs. Read more...
Depends. If the primary tumor is not producing severe bleeding or obstruction the most serious condition is the liver metastasis and should be treated first with chemo. Response to chemo will determine the next step which may be hepatectomy with or without colon resection. A colectomy will control primary disease but the metastasis will determine long term survival. No question about it. Read more...

Can always being constipated lead to colon or rectal cancer?

Not really, but... Theoretically, constipation allows toxins in our everyday food to stay longer in contact with the lining of the colon, thus exposing the cells to the possible mutagenic effects for longer. One of the ways a high fiber diet is thought to be protective, is it speeds elimination, reducing toxin exposure thus reducing cancer risk. Plus, it tastes good! Read more...
Assoc, not cause. Dietary habits that can lead to constipation (low fiber, low intake of whole grains, legumes, fruits and veggies, high fat), can be associated (statistically in populations) with increased rates of colon and rectal cancer. Fiber supplements, vitamin supplements don't help out, diet does. There are other causes for constipation. Discuss with your doc; see a dietician if needed.. Read more...

Does IBS lead to colon or rectal cancer?

No. While the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (ibs) can be severe and very distressing, IBS does not lead to colorectal cancer. People who have IBS have the same risk of developing polyps in the colon as other people of average risk for developing colorectal cancer. Read more...
Probably not. Ibs probably does not lead to colon or rectal cancer. Certainly, no studies have found this. However, some of the symptoms of ibs, particularly ibs with constipation, may delay diagnosis of colon and rectal cancer. It may be harder to notice a change in bowel habits when your bowel habits change from day to day. Read more...

Are colonoscopy, endoscopy, and anoscopy all good ways to tell if I had colon or rectal cancer?

No. endoscopy is a general term that means putting a camera in the body, colonoscopy is endoscopy of the colon and is the gold standard for screening for colon cancer. Anoscopy is an in office procedure to look at the rectum only, usually used to evaluate hemorrhoids, anal fissures and anal/rectal masses and pain. During a colonoscopy a good GI doc will evaluate the anus and rectum as well. Read more...
Full colon. a colonoscopy would be the best way to look at the entire colon for evidence of colon or rectal cancer. Anoscopy just looks at the end and endoscopy is usually the stomach and upper intestines. Read more...

Does food intolerance or lactose intolerance increase your risk for colon or rectal cancer?

No. There are many studies done on food intolerances and food allergies, with mixed results in the latter. As far as food intolerances are concerned, it is not felt that there is a link to cancer. Read more...

How high would chances be that symptomatic colon or rectal cancer be missed on 3 separate CT scans? Would this be very likely?

Colo-Rectal Cancer . It wasn't clear to me whether or not you are "symptomatic." if not, and you are young colon cancer is more likely to appear after age 50 unless you have a cancer gene)> chances of missing a tumor on 3 ct scans are low, but possible. A better screening test is a colonoscopy. You should discuss this with your doctor if it remains a concern. Read more...
Possible to miss. The colon has many folds and turns with stool inside it. It would have to be big enough for a ct scan to show it and contrast inside the colon might help identify it on a ct scan. But it can miss a lesion. The best way to see colon cancer is taking a prep to clean out the colon and getting an endoscopy (colonoscopy) that can visualize the cancer and biopsy it at the same time. Read more...