Seeing spots symptoms of carotid artery disease?

Very rarely,if ever. Usual is amaurosis fugax, like a shade coming down over the vision of one eye only, but not both.An unusual variation is bright light amaurosis, brought on in one eye when in bright light, because the extra light puts more demand on the retina.The key in all vision changes with carotid disease is that it is monocular, a point missed by most practitioners.If a symptom affects both eyes, not carotid!
Not typically. Cartid artery stenosis can cause loss of vision in one eye as if u pull a black shade in front of it but not typically causes seeing spots.

Related Questions

I'm seeing spots with carotid artery disease, is that bad?

It may be. The two can be related. Please see the link below. You should definitely talk to your doctor about this. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000784.htm. Read more...
Please. Be evaluated by an opthalmologist as well as by your doctor and or a neurologist. You may need an eye exam, a carotid doppler and possibly a trans cranial doppler. These will direct medical vs surgical treatment options. Read more...

Seeing spots with carotid artery disease? Is that a sign of bad clogging?

Possibly. If you develop transient visual disturbance like curtain coming down your eye, it may well be early sign of carotid disease so see your doc soon. Read more...
Possible. Typical eye symptoms of significant carotid disease is loss of vision/ or part of the visual field in one eye which is called amaurosis fugax. If you experience that then you need to be checked by your physician with carotid duplex ultrasound. Spots can still be a sign but you better be checked by an ophthalmologist . Read more...

Should I be concerned with a new side effect of carotid artery disease? I have been suffering from carotid artery disease, however recently I started seeing black spots. I know that this is a side effect, but should I be concerned of this sudden appearanc

This . This is a very serious symptom, and should prompt immediate medical attention. These black spots in your vision may be a result of fragments of the carotid artery plaque breaking free and traveling up to the brain or eye. This heralds carotid plaque instability and the potential for a stroke, which occurs when a ruptured fragment of the atherosclerotic plaque blocks a brain artery. People with carotid artery disease who have symptoms should not only be on certain medications, but they should also be evaluated for surgery or carotid artery stenting. Read more...
Yes. Yes, you should be concerned as you may have an ulcerated plaque or an irrregular lining to your carotid vessels that supply the brain. If a piece breaks off and goes through your neck into your ophthalmic artery the blood supply to your eye it could be causing these black spots. I would see medical consultation immediately. Your body could be warning you that a stroke is coming. Read more...

What symptoms typically go along with carotid artery disease?

Sometimes none. Carotid artery disease often causes no symptoms at all. Sometimes it's detected accidentally, when a sound ("bruit") is heard in the neck, or a doppler is done because of non-specific symptoms such as dizziness. When it does cause symptoms, it's usually a temporary loss of vision in one eye, or a weakness or numbness on one side of the body. Read more...
Risk of stroke. Carotid disease is a risk factor for stroke. Prior to a stroke, a patient may have transient ischemic attacks (tias), which are brief episodes of weakness or numbness on one side of the body, coordination or speech difficulties. A specific TIA attributable to carotid disease is a brief loss of vision in one eye called amaurosis fugax. Treatment of asymptomatic carotid disease is controversial. Read more...

What does having carotid artery disease mean?

Stenosis. Carotid disease is most commonly referred to as a narrowing of the carotid arteries at the bifurcation in the neck. This accumulation of plaque usually occurs in patients with risk factors for peripheral vascular disease such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and smoking. Plaque is brittle and can cause debris to break off and cause a stroke. Read more...
See below. Carotid artery disease means that the carotid arteries have blockage, usually in the form of atherosclerosis. This is diagnosed with a special ultrasound called a carotid duplex scan. In the absence of neurological symptoms, most cases can be handled with medicine and close periodic follow up by a vascular surgeon. However, if the blockage is more than 80%, surgery will reduce the risk of stroke. Read more...
Plaque. Plaque or hardening of the arteries forming in the vessels of your neck. Can lead to stroke. Read more...
See below. Carotid artery disease means that the carotid arteries have blockage, usually in the form of atherosclerosis. In the absence of neurological symptoms, most cases can be handled with medicine and close periodic follow up by a vascular surgeon. However, if the blockage is more than 80%, surgery will reduce the risk of stroke. In special instances, carotid angioplasty and stent may be an option. Read more...
Hardeningof arteries. Hardening of the arteries may involve carotid arteries. If it progresses it may narrow circulation to the brain or throw off clots to the brain. Symptoms can be transient weakness, numbness, or blindness in one eye or they may be a stroke. If no symptoms, narrowing of the carotid artery of 80% or more means increased risk for stroke and prophylactic surgery may be indicated. Read more...

What are the symtoms of carotid artery disease with narrowing?

Tia, visual chsnges. If you develop transient visual disturbance like curtain coming down your eye, tia, it may well be early sign of carotid disease so see your doc soon. Read more...
Stroke. Typically has no symptoms but with advance percentage of narrowing will increase risk of stroke or mini stroke. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Carotid artery disease?

Carotid Artery. Disease= a number pathologic processes that affect the carotid arteries. In common usage it generally implies atherosclerotic disease. Read more...