3 doctors weighed in:

Bilateral pleural effusions and some ascites that was not there previously following a percutaneous liver bx. What exactly would be the cause?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Myron Arlen
Surgery - Oncology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Some malignancy

Not many lesions of the thoracic cage such as lung produce bilateral pleural effusion, some ascites and a metastatic focus in the liver. The most common abdominal lesion to behave in this fashion is ovarian Ca with metastasis.
If you are not aware of a primary, liver bx and PET/CAT should resolve the issue so that proper treatment can be initiated.

In brief: Some malignancy

Not many lesions of the thoracic cage such as lung produce bilateral pleural effusion, some ascites and a metastatic focus in the liver. The most common abdominal lesion to behave in this fashion is ovarian Ca with metastasis.
If you are not aware of a primary, liver bx and PET/CAT should resolve the issue so that proper treatment can be initiated.
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Buck Parker
Board Certified, Surgery
16 years in practice
469K people helped
Continue
100,000 doctors available