12 doctors weighed in:

Is Physiotherapy the correct treatment for Ulnar Nerve Entrapment?

12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mariaelaina Sumas
Neurosurgery
4 doctors agree

In brief: Try 1st/mayneed surg

One can try Physiotherapy (Physical therapy) first but if you continue to have weakness and numbness then you may require surgical decompression without/with transposition.
If your entrapment is at elbow then do not rest that arm on anything and you may benefit from a neoprene sleeve.

In brief: Try 1st/mayneed surg

One can try Physiotherapy (Physical therapy) first but if you continue to have weakness and numbness then you may require surgical decompression without/with transposition.
If your entrapment is at elbow then do not rest that arm on anything and you may benefit from a neoprene sleeve.
Thank
1 comment
Dr. William Haehl
I agree with Dr Sumas. I had the same problem and got over symptoms without surgery by immediately removing all arms from my office chairs, doing physical therapy that I actually saw on utube video, splinting my arm out straight and protecting elbow with splint made from large bath towel and Duct tape at night.; loose fitting and slide on at night. See the physical therapist for help.
Dr. Craig Morton
Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine
5 doctors agree

In brief: Sometimes

Ulnar nerve entrapment typically occurs at the elbow, but can also occur at the wrist.
A short course of anti-inflammatories, bracing, and activity modification can usually resolve the symptoms. A referral to a specialist may be needed if symptoms persist.

In brief: Sometimes

Ulnar nerve entrapment typically occurs at the elbow, but can also occur at the wrist.
A short course of anti-inflammatories, bracing, and activity modification can usually resolve the symptoms. A referral to a specialist may be needed if symptoms persist.
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Per Freitag
Non-operative treatment for cubital tunnel syndrome is usually not successful. I have had great results with partial medial epicondylectomy and neurolysis of the ulnar nerve. Transposition works also but is a lot more extensive in its approach and surgery
Dr. Olav Jaren
Neurology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It is helpful

Yes, sometimes this is the right therapy.
Exercises and splinting are often helpful for ulnar nerve maladies. There are times however when surgery is needed, normally this is in the setting of prominent hand weakness or when physiotherapy is not successful.

In brief: It is helpful

Yes, sometimes this is the right therapy.
Exercises and splinting are often helpful for ulnar nerve maladies. There are times however when surgery is needed, normally this is in the setting of prominent hand weakness or when physiotherapy is not successful.
Thank
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