6 doctors weighed in:

What to do when your child bullies?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Holly Maes
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Age Dependent

How you respond depends on if your child is 4 or 14.
Bullies are generally insecure about something, or are being bullied themselves and do it to others to feel in some control or have power. Always tell them it is never ok to say those things to someone. Then try and delve into what is really bothering your child. Is it something at home, school, and inquire with the child how you can help.

In brief: Age Dependent

How you respond depends on if your child is 4 or 14.
Bullies are generally insecure about something, or are being bullied themselves and do it to others to feel in some control or have power. Always tell them it is never ok to say those things to someone. Then try and delve into what is really bothering your child. Is it something at home, school, and inquire with the child how you can help.
Dr. Holly Maes
Dr. Holly Maes
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Kathryn Seifert
If the problem continues after discussions and guidance, The problem may be larger. You may want an evaluation by a psychologist. The younger a child is when he starts bullying, the more severe the bullying, and the more difficult it is to get him to stop, the more likely it is a more serious problem and needs professional intervention.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Thanks to both professionals. It's often more than talk. If you've gone hungry because your lunch money was stolen, or you've had your homework shredded, you'll remember that bullying includes both verbal abuse and behavior that in the adult world would be prosecuted as criminal.
Dr. Andrew Berry
Clinical Psychology

In brief: Insecurity

Most of the time, children who bully are insecure, and are not future sociopaths.
Get the child to open up about the insecurity which usually involves damaged interpersonal relationships, or, find a reputable child psychotherapist for your child to speak with.

In brief: Insecurity

Most of the time, children who bully are insecure, and are not future sociopaths.
Get the child to open up about the insecurity which usually involves damaged interpersonal relationships, or, find a reputable child psychotherapist for your child to speak with.
Dr. Andrew Berry
Dr. Andrew Berry
Thank
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