Would a normal d dimer rule out DVT or pulmonary embolism?

For the most part. The d-dimer test is nonspecific to blood clots and can be elevated for other reasons however it is almost always elevated with acute (new) blood clots. If a person has risk factors (smoking, immobility, obesity, recent orthopedic surgery, cancer) and symptoms, an ultrasound should be ordered regardless of the d-dimer. In a low-risk patient a negative d-dimer effectively rules out acute DVT/PE.
Dvt. with a normal d-dimer, there is a very low probability of any clot formation.
Usually. No test is perfect, but a d-dimer is very good at ruling out a DVT and pulmonary embolism. If you have actually been seen by a doctor and had a normal d-dimer, you can be very confident that you do not have a clot in your leg or lung causing your symptoms.
Ddimer. would not totally exclude dvt or pe other testing would be needed.

Related Questions

Is a d-dimer enough to rule out a DVT or pulmonary embolism. Suffering from chest pain, shortness of bteath, n burning n swelling in legs n back?

Yes. Yes, D-diner has a high negative predictive value. That means that if the test is negative, it strongly predicts the ABSENCE of DVT. Iss positive predictive value is lower; that is, D-dimmer may be positive but the patient not have DVT. Read more...
Yes. If a D dimer is negative, you are unlikely to have a DVT or Pulmonary Embolism. If it is positive, it does not mean you do have a DVT or Pulmonary Embolism as other chronic conditions can cause an elevated D dimer and further tests such as doppler ultrasound of the lower extremity or Chest CT with Pulmonary Embolism Protocol has to be done for further evaluation. Read more...
Not 100% negative ddimer makes it very unlikely but a positive ddimer requires further testing. Read more...
Yes and no. d-dimer is quite a good test to rule out DVT and PE in patients with low and moderate risks. so for the most part, yes, if the d-dimer is negative, the probability of one having DVT and PE are quite low. The caveat, however, is in "high risk" patients, according to well's algorithm, a more definitive test (like a CT) is needed. Read more...
In some settings. In the outpatient setting, where you have not had recent surgery or other reasons to put you into a "high risk" category, a negative d-dimer is enough to eliminate DVT/pulmonary embolism from the differential diagnosis. On the other hand, a positive d-dimer is not specific for PE, it only tells you to do further testing such as doppler ultrasound, CTPAgram or V/Q scan. Read more...

If I have been cleared of DVT via 3 ultrasounds and a negative d dimer. Is it possible to still have a pulmonary embolism?

DVT. AND PE. Is highly unlikely. PE come from larger veins and US would detect a clot. Negative D Dimer is reassuring. . Read more...
Probably not. If you have any chest symptoms a ct of the lungs rules out that possibility. So with the tests you already had it appears to me that any blood clot has been ruled out in the lower extremities. Read more...
Unlikely. Negative d- dimer is very predictive that no unusual clotting is happening. Read more...

Is a D-DIMER FEU blood test better test than D-DIMER DDU blood test for exclusion of DVT and/or pulmonary embolism? If no why?

Ddimer. If d-dimer is negative, it certainly rules out dvt. If d-dimer is positive, it does not alone confirm a clot. If positive d-dimer, you will need additional test including ultrasound. Read more...

Can early kidney disease increase your chances of having a DVT or pulmonary embolism?

Kidney disease. 54 M asks if early Kidney disease increases risk of DVT or PE? ANS: there are many kinds of kidney disease some do and some don't so need more details. Most likely one for clots is renal cell carcinoma. Read more...
Slightly increased . No conclusive data yet, but may slightly elevate the risk. We know from the LITE study that mildly decreased kidney function was associated with a 1.3-fold increased risk of VTE, but this wasn't independent of cardiovascular risk factor levels. Also microalbuminuria is independently associated with increased VTE risk in large cohorts with near two-fold increased risk. Read more...

20 hour roadtrip with my family will this put me at risk for DVT or pulmonary embolism? No health risks, fam history or factors

Precaution only. Just keep moving your legs even now and then, flex your foot up and down, just little things, and you'll be fine. Read more...
DVT and travel. One of the causes of DVT is venous stasis and this is due to prolonged immobility as can occur with long drives or flights. So a 20 hour road trip could potentially increase your risk of developing a DVT. Stopping every 2 to 3 hours to get up and walk and wearing support hose during the trip would also help to mitigate the chances of developing a DVT. Read more...

I was diagnosed with dvt and pulmonary embolism about a month ago does that mean I have a blood disorder?

Dvt. Not necessarily If there is a reason why this developed e.g trauma,airplane travel,on bed rest ,oral contraceptives use then no.however,if not should be evaluated by a hematologist to determine if there is a hypercoagulable state.this is more common in people with a family history. Read more...

Does increase bilirubin and AST levels have a link to DVT and pulmonary embolism?

None. that I know, although the bilirubin and enzymes have been reported to increase slightly if the embolism has led to a signioficnt INFARCTION ("death") of lung tissue! Hope this is helpful Dr Z. Read more...

I have a pulmonary embolism and wonder if DVT was missed?

Yes and no. Usually, DVT doesn't show up because most of it has travelled to your lung already. Read more...
Maybe. Dvt is the most common source of a pulmonary embolism but the treatment of pe and DVT is typically the same. I prefer to test for DVT in all pe patients and to test for pe in all DVT patients. The pe you find is usually the one you survive. The pe you die from is typically still in your leg so it's worth knowing if it's there. Read more...
Not neccesarily. You don't have to have a DVT though it is common to have one in the setting of a pulmonary embolism. Sometimes the DVT is dislodged into the lungs and you won't see it. Blood disorders can also be a cause. . Read more...