5 doctors weighed in:

I have reactive airway disease and not asthma. What is the difference?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Ramirez
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Very mild asthma

More and more we are shying away from using that term. It is usually used to label very mild asthma that flares up very infrequently, usually due to a well-defined trigger like infections, wheather change, pollen, etc.
There's a reason asthma meds like albuterol are used for this.

In brief: Very mild asthma

More and more we are shying away from using that term. It is usually used to label very mild asthma that flares up very infrequently, usually due to a well-defined trigger like infections, wheather change, pollen, etc.
There's a reason asthma meds like albuterol are used for this.
Dr. Robert Ramirez
Dr. Robert Ramirez
Thank
Dr. Paul Williams
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: May be the same

Reactive airway disease is a more general term that includes asthma, but also other conditions that can present with wheezing or shortness of breath.
In older children and adults, reactive airway disease is usually asthma.

In brief: May be the same

Reactive airway disease is a more general term that includes asthma, but also other conditions that can present with wheezing or shortness of breath.
In older children and adults, reactive airway disease is usually asthma.
Dr. Paul Williams
Dr. Paul Williams
Thank
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