I dislocated my knee and have a piece of fractured bone under my kneecap what's my options?

Surgery. If there's a piece of bone floating around in your knee joint, it most likely will need to be removed, hopefully it can be done arthroscopically.
Probable surgery. A dislocated knee is a serious injury. Often there are multiple ligaments torn,cartilage injury, and occasionally nerve injury.The first step would be to have a thorough evaluation by a knee specialist. It is likely that you will require surgery. The nature of the surgery will be determined by your examination. Surgery may consist of an arthroscopy, removal of the bone, and ligament reconstruction.

Related Questions

How can I tell from a dislocated leg bone from a broken bone? Also which is worst?

Difficult to say. If you even question this, it is probably highly advisable for you to see a physician for evaluation...Differential diagnosis is difficult without a good history and physical evaluation and perhaps some imaging studies.. See your family doc or orthopaedist..Soon. Read more...
Depends. You must get an x-ray first. Depends on the injury as too which is worst. Read more...

Can a dislocated knee cause a fracture in the femur and bone bruising?

Dislocated knee. Differentiate between dislocated patella and a dislocated knee--but, yes, both can cause fracture and bone bruise. Higher energy injury may be the culprit. Read more...
Dislocated Knee. A dislocated knee is when the tibia and femur dislocate. This is a true orthopedic emergency. More common is a patella that is dislocating or subluxating. If the knee truely dislocated then it usually occurs from high speed trauma and a fracture can occur. However, usually the ligaments rupture and i cannot recall seeing a femur fracture. Now bone edema or contusion will invariably occur. Read more...

Are there any little tricks to speeding up the recovery of a broken bone? Any help is welcome, please... I'm a collegiate women lacrosse player, and broke my leg skateboarding 2 & 1/2 weeks ago. I completely dislocated my ankle, and fractured my tib/fib. I

There . There is nothing in the current state of technology that accelerates bone healing. However, there are ways to slow it down. Too much activity too soon can cause motion at the fracture site that disrupts the healing tissue. Infection (more often with surgery, but can rarely happen without surgery) also delays healing. Smoking or any source of nicotine also slows bone healing, though i assume at your level of athletics, you are not a smoker. Anti-inflammatories (advil, aleve, aspirin, etc.) can be the hidden factor in a bone not healing and should be used sparingly, if at all. I agree that ligament healing after a dislocation is equally important with bone healing and can take longer. Some severe ligament injuries, such as the syndesmosis which holds the tibia and fibula together, can take more than 3 months to heal. While bone stimulators--devices that use electricity, magnets, or ultrasound to create an electrical field around the bone and promote healing--can help in people at risk for poor healing, they don't decrease healing time enough to get you back for the spring and do nothing to promote ligament healing that we're aware. It is very important to get good nutrition, including protein, calcium, and vitamin d for bone healing. It is also important to maintain whatever muscles you can by moving the parts that are not immobilized for the fracture/dislocation. While i assume the fractures occurred near your ankle, fractures higher in the leg also take a lot longer to heal, with the average time of healing being about 16 to 18 weeks for the midshaft tibia. Good luck with your recovery, but it looks like you're in a red shirt! Read more...
Spring . Spring season is out of the question, based on the injuries you describe. And trying to force it early will result in permanant injury. Bone healing takes 6 weeks. The ankle dislocation is the real problem. The ligaments will need 56 weeks to heal, and then, and only then can physical therapy start to restore range of motion and strength. Listen to what your orthopaedic surgeon tells you like it is the word of god. That is the best trick for a speedy recovery. Read more...
Bad injury. Sorry to hear about this injury. Dr. Wood has given you great information about the nature of healing. In some people though, the homeopathic remedy symphytum at 30c has helped promote fracture healing. You'll still need to stay off your leg, allowing xrays to document your progress before playing sports again. A homeopathic doctor may be able to help, along w/your other physicians. Read more...

Had light leg tibial bone fracture on lefside in Lift crash accident 2 year back, ACL ligament is lax leading to mal aligned knee, my age (34), suggest?

See a specialist. Without more details, it's impossible to know the best course of action. See a knee specialist, get imaging and testing, and the doctor will help you to determine a course of action to take. Good luck! Read more...

What exactly is done with having a micro fracture surgery in your knee? Where exactly do they do that? I am am having it under the kneecap? Recovery?

Arthroscopic surgery. Microfracture surgery is an arthroscopic surgical procedure where a sharp pick is used to poke holes into places of bare bone where cartilage is missing. This creates bleeding bone that scabs over the bare bone with scar tissue. Most surgeons limit patients weight bearing with crutches and possibly a knee brace for 4-6 weeks after the surgery. Knee cap microfracture surgery has mixed results. Read more...

7 yr ago lower distal pole fracture patella. 3 years ago wire removed (broke). Kneeling on that knee is very uncomfortable or painful. Normal?

No. Not normal, but not unusual. You have probably developed some degree of post-traumatic arthritis in the under surface of your patella, otherwise known as chondromalacia. Don't hesitate to be seen if you are having a lot of trouble with it. Read more...

I fell onto bent knee. Now I get a HORRIFIC pain if I kneel, below patella, on the part thats on floor. I basically can't kneel. My walk is okay, there is no fracture and patella is okay. Whatshould I do?

You need to . See an orthopedist. How do you know there is no fracture? If you know because you went to a doctor, then what did they tell you? Just because you walk does not mean there is no fracture. Patellar tendonitis can be very painful as well. A proper exam is warranted, particularly with that much pain. I would ice it until being able to be seen. Read more...
Many possibilities. A fall directly onto the anterior knee can cause prepatellar bursitis, patellar tendonitis, hematoma, chondral damage to the patella, effusion of the knee, and more. As you can see, the list is long and you should follow up with your orthopedic surgeon to let them know about your ongoing problems. More testing may be needed, then treatment can be rendered. Read more...
Knee pain. Significant pain in the knee after a fall is concerning for a soft tissue injury if the xray shows no fracture. The meniscus (cartilage) could have torn, and that can be seen on MRI scan. Tendonitis can also cause pain below the patella, as can bursitis. Your physician can detect the likely cause, and order the correct test and treatment. Read more...

Dislocated knee with fractured kneecap treatment?

This depends on ... What kind of dislocation? I would guess your knee cap slid out of position and when it came back a piece of the knee cap fractured. In this case the knee cap fracture dictates the treatment course. If the fracture is out of position you may need surgery. If it is not, bracing followed by pt can be helpful. Ultimately if knee cap is unstable you may need surgery to repair ligaments. Read more...