5 doctors weighed in:

Can I correct my color blindness?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology
2 doctors agree

In brief: No

I assume you have inherited color deficiency.
This is a permanent change in the pigments of your light receptors altering the light detection spectrum. This cannot be improved. The use of a red contact lense is suggested as an improvement, but this merely shifts the axis of the defect to another direction to allow passage of color detection plates but leavers you color blind in new direction.

In brief: No

I assume you have inherited color deficiency.
This is a permanent change in the pigments of your light receptors altering the light detection spectrum. This cannot be improved. The use of a red contact lense is suggested as an improvement, but this merely shifts the axis of the defect to another direction to allow passage of color detection plates but leavers you color blind in new direction.
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Thank
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

There is no way to correct a person's color vision deficiency (color blindness), because his eyes are genetically unable to perceive certain colors (certain wavelengths of light).
There have been contact lenses and glasses that alter the intensity or contrast among colors that the color blind person can see. With improved contrast, the person may distinguish objects, letters, or words more easily.

In brief: No

There is no way to correct a person's color vision deficiency (color blindness), because his eyes are genetically unable to perceive certain colors (certain wavelengths of light).
There have been contact lenses and glasses that alter the intensity or contrast among colors that the color blind person can see. With improved contrast, the person may distinguish objects, letters, or words more easily.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
Thank
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