Can I correct my color blindness?

No. I assume you have inherited color deficiency. This is a permanent change in the pigments of your light receptors altering the light detection spectrum. This cannot be improved. The use of a red contact lense is suggested as an improvement, but this merely shifts the axis of the defect to another direction to allow passage of color detection plates but leavers you color blind in new direction.
No. There is no way to correct a person's color vision deficiency (color blindness), because his eyes are genetically unable to perceive certain colors (certain wavelengths of light). There have been contact lenses and glasses that alter the intensity or contrast among colors that the color blind person can see. With improved contrast, the person may distinguish objects, letters, or words more easily.

Related Questions

What is the rate of occurrence of color blindness in the u.S.?

Rates. Occurrence is the number used to show how many new cases of something are diagnosed per year. Prevalence is the number of actual cases of the diagnosed condition present at any one time. Approximately 1 in every 75 people have a diagnosis of "color blindness.". Read more...
About 8% The standard statistics for inherited color deficiency is about 7.5% in males and 1/2 % in females. This can vary somewhat with different racial groups. The degree of color deficiency and the type are variable so your ophthalmologist can test you and see in which category you are if that is important to you and also give you information about your family possibilities. Read more...

Is it common to develop color blindness in your mid 20's?

Rare. Color deficiency is inherited at birth. A few global diseases of the retina and rare strokes of the brain can affect color vision in an adult, but these are rare. Read more...
Unusual. Color deficiency is an inherited condition. Some extremely rare strokes of the brain can affect color perception. Global disease of the retina can also lower color perception in an adult. Read more...

Signs of child being color blind?

Depends upon age. Obviously inability to distinguish between red / green colors. Some have trouble with blue/yellow. It does assume the child knows his colors. I am not aware of a condition where no colors are seen. These are usually specific to certain colors. Read more...

How to determine if someone is color blind?

Testing. The most common type of "color blindness" is red-green color deficiency. Blue-yellow deficiency or true color blindness (achromatopsia) are rare. Color testing can identify which. The problem is a lack of certain types of cones or their opsins (light-sensitive compounds). Red-green deficiency can be adapted to fairly easily and is not very limiting, but the others can significantly impact vision. Read more...
Testing. There are tests on line that can give you an approximate answer. Your ophthalmologist has test plates for the definitive answer. Read more...

What happens when you go completely color blind?

No good. If you are progressively losing your ability to distinguish different colors at your young age, you need to seek medical attention. "normal" color blindness is present at birth and not progressive. Read more...

What are the different ways to being color blind?

Mostly congenital. Color blindness (actually color confision) is not uncommon, being present from birth in 6% of males and .6% of females. It can also be aquired rarely, with disease of the optic nerve or macula. Read more...
Several types. There are several different types of inherited color deficiency varying in spectrum and intensity. You can lose color recognition by advanced retinal disease like diabetes or retinitis pigmentosa. Optic nerve disease can change color recognition and there are a few rare cortical strokes that can do this. Read more...

What exactly are the different ways to being color blind?

Varied. The most common type of "color blindness" is red-green color deficiency. Blue-yellow deficiency or true color blindness (achromatopsia) are rare. Color testing can identify which. The problem is a lack of certain types of cones or their opsins (light-sensitive compounds). Red-green deficiency can be adapted to fairly easily and is not very limiting, but the others can significantly impact vision. Read more...

What is color blindness?

Unable to see colors. People who are colorblind are unable to distinguish between certain colors. Most commonly it affects only certain colors, such as green and brown, but in some people other colors are also affected. Read more...
Color blindness. Color blindness is a congenital or acquired condition whereby a person cannot see certain colors well because the parts of the eye that receive those wavelengths of light do not function well. For example, some people are born with red=green color blindness. They cannot see the color red or green well. Those colors would look gray or "washed out". Special tests can determine color blindness. Read more...