4 doctors weighed in:
What causes migraines?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. Allen Seely
General Practice
2 doctors agree
In brief: CAUSE and TRIGGERS
Migraines may be caused by changes in the brain/ trigeminal nerve=pain pathway.
Serotonin (a brain chemical) imbalance may also play a role as serotonin levels drop during attacks. Many known triggers are noted: alcohol, cheeses, chocolate, msg, salty foods, 'diet sodas', 'skipping meals', 'lack of sleep', pms-homones, stress, strong odors, bright lights, physical exertion... Just to name a few.

Consult Dr. Allen Seely now ›
In brief: CAUSE and TRIGGERS
Migraines may be caused by changes in the brain/ trigeminal nerve=pain pathway.
Serotonin (a brain chemical) imbalance may also play a role as serotonin levels drop during attacks. Many known triggers are noted: alcohol, cheeses, chocolate, msg, salty foods, 'diet sodas', 'skipping meals', 'lack of sleep', pms-homones, stress, strong odors, bright lights, physical exertion... Just to name a few. Consult Dr. Allen Seely now ›
1 comment
Dr. Allen Seely
I Usually start with OTC Migraine products 'Excedrin Migraine' or others. You may respond to a 'triptan' (needs a presciption) 'Frova' MAY help 'menstrual migraines' Good Luck!
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Dr. Allen Seely
General Practice , 23 years in practice
Dr. Steven Bender
Dentistry
In brief: Not known
While the cause for migraine is not known yet, it appears that the brain of migraine sufferers is different than those who do not get headaches.
It seems that the migraine brain responds differently to stimulus in such a way as to cause incresed nerve activity leading to pain. While certain "triggers" appear to be responsible for headache onset, they are not proven. Migraine seems to be genetic.

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In brief: Not known
While the cause for migraine is not known yet, it appears that the brain of migraine sufferers is different than those who do not get headaches.
It seems that the migraine brain responds differently to stimulus in such a way as to cause incresed nerve activity leading to pain. While certain "triggers" appear to be responsible for headache onset, they are not proven. Migraine seems to be genetic. Chat with a doctor now ›
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Dr. Steven Bender
Dentistry , 27 years in practice
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Dr. Vikram Patel
Board Certified,
33 years in practice
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