8 doctors weighed in:

I have had several migraines over the last 1 1/2 weeks. I have also had twitching over my left eye during this time. Are the two possibly related?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Marx
Pain Management
5 doctors agree

In brief: Possibly

Especially if the twitching is associated with stress or anxiety as these conditions can provoke a migraine.
If the conditions persist, see your doctor.

In brief: Possibly

Especially if the twitching is associated with stress or anxiety as these conditions can provoke a migraine.
If the conditions persist, see your doctor.
Dr. James Marx
Dr. James Marx
Thank
2 doctors agree

In brief: My thots

Episodic migraine does cause transient morbidity and even disability, and the pain and stress can affect sleep and emotions secondarily.
Your eye twitching seems consistent with myokymia and would not be surprised if the migraine events have triggered as a secondary effect. Get this pattern interrupted by either OTC or prescription meds, as this could lead to chronic headaches if not done.

In brief: My thots

Episodic migraine does cause transient morbidity and even disability, and the pain and stress can affect sleep and emotions secondarily.
Your eye twitching seems consistent with myokymia and would not be surprised if the migraine events have triggered as a secondary effect. Get this pattern interrupted by either OTC or prescription meds, as this could lead to chronic headaches if not done.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Thank
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Stress

Sounds like stress and or anxiety.
Random twitching of an eyelid, which happens in normal people, is called myokymia (an involuntary, spontaneous, quivering of a few muscle cell bundles within a muscle). Myokymia starts and stops spontaneously. In the eyelids, it can last a few minutes to a few days. Often triggered by stress, dry eyes, caffeine, or lack of sleep. Same triggers for migraine.

In brief: Stress

Sounds like stress and or anxiety.
Random twitching of an eyelid, which happens in normal people, is called myokymia (an involuntary, spontaneous, quivering of a few muscle cell bundles within a muscle). Myokymia starts and stops spontaneously. In the eyelids, it can last a few minutes to a few days. Often triggered by stress, dry eyes, caffeine, or lack of sleep. Same triggers for migraine.
Dr. Michael Ham
Dr. Michael Ham
Thank
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