8 doctors weighed in:

Im getting a nuclear scan and have a newborn. What are risks for the baby?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Djang
Nuclear Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Depends

Depends on the type of scan you are receiving.
For most, you may simply have to "pump and dump" your breastmilk for a day or two. You should let the nuclear medicine department know you have a newborn before you receive any injections; they should be able to give you excellent instructions.

In brief: Depends

Depends on the type of scan you are receiving.
For most, you may simply have to "pump and dump" your breastmilk for a day or two. You should let the nuclear medicine department know you have a newborn before you receive any injections; they should be able to give you excellent instructions.
Dr. David Djang
Dr. David Djang
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: None

Nuclear scans are safe to your baby as there is no radiation exposure, isotope life span is short , ( half life of radioactive isotope ) , but do not breast the baby for few days, as the isotope may be secreted in to milk.
Ask your doctor for more information.

In brief: None

Nuclear scans are safe to your baby as there is no radiation exposure, isotope life span is short , ( half life of radioactive isotope ) , but do not breast the baby for few days, as the isotope may be secreted in to milk.
Ask your doctor for more information.
Dr. Addagada Rao
Dr. Addagada Rao
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Dr. Luke Bolek
Nuclear Medicine

In brief: Avoid a iodine 131

If you are breast feeding u must avoid getting an I 131 scan which is used to diagnose and treat thyroid cancer as I 131 passes through the breast milk and will be absorbed by the baby's thyroid glad.

In brief: Avoid a iodine 131

If you are breast feeding u must avoid getting an I 131 scan which is used to diagnose and treat thyroid cancer as I 131 passes through the breast milk and will be absorbed by the baby's thyroid glad.
Dr. Luke Bolek
Dr. Luke Bolek
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Dr. Gerald Mandell
Nuclear Medicine

In brief: Usualy no risk

If isotope is low radiation burden with short half life no significant risk is present.
Patient should refrain from breast feeding for 4 half lives with most common istotope technetium with half life of 6 hours. Patient should discuss risks with administering physician before having the test.

In brief: Usualy no risk

If isotope is low radiation burden with short half life no significant risk is present.
Patient should refrain from breast feeding for 4 half lives with most common istotope technetium with half life of 6 hours. Patient should discuss risks with administering physician before having the test.
Dr. Gerald Mandell
Dr. Gerald Mandell
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