How are parathyroid disorders found?

Blood test & imaging. It can be confirmed by lab and urine tests, followed by imaging studies (parathyroid scan +/- neck ultrasound).
Labs mostly. These days, abnormal parathyroid glands (overactive) are diagnosed when your doctor orders routine blood work. Hyperparathyroidism brings about elevated calcium levels. If your calcium level is confirmed to be high, your doctor will usually check a parathyroid hormone level. Before these lab tests were done routinely, people were diagnosed when they had a comlication of the disease.
Parathyroid. Now the most common ay parathyroid disorders are found is on routine lab testing done for any reason. Calcium returns elevated and that starts the process.

Related Questions

Who gets parathyroid disease?

Anybody. There are a few hereditary causes of parathyroid disease which can increase your risk above the general population but generally speaking, parathyroid disease can occur in anyone and at any age, although the average is around 60 years of age. Read more...
Common. Like most endocrine diseases, parathyroid disease is most common in women. It may have hereditary factors. But most patients with hyperrparathyroidism do not have any obvious risk factors. Note: dialysis patients have their own type of parathyroid issues related to lack of renal function, etc. Read more...

Are parathyroid disorders hereditary?

Yes and no. Parathyroid disorder can occur in anyone but it could also be hereditary (that is if a family member has hyperparathyrodiism, you are at higher risk of developing the disease). There is also a condition called men (multiple endocrine neoplasm) that can increase your risk of parathyroid disease if someone in your family has it. Read more...
Mostly not. Most parathyroid disorders are not hereditary, but some can be, particulalry those associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia (men1 and men2a). Read more...
Very rarely. Hi. Primary hyperparathyroidism can be hereditary in familial primary hyperparathyroidism, MEN-1, and MEN-2a (but not MEN-2b). Otherwise, the disease is sporadic. Read more...

How are parathyroid disorders treated?

Many. If it's hyperparathyroidism, the best treatment is surgery. Medications and possibly alcohol injection can be used but these are inferior to surgery and only considered when surgery is refused or contraindicated. If it's hypoparathyroidism, the treatment is calcium and vitamin d (both inactive and active) replacement. Read more...
Most common. The most common parathyroid disease is primary hyperparathyroidism, in which one or more of the four glands becomes over active leading to high blood calcium. The only cure for this is surgical removal of the parathyroid gland(s). Read more...
Surgery. Most patients undergo surgery. Some have vit d correction first in case the PTH is up just for that reason. Patients who are too sick for surgery of with kidney disease are sometimes treated with a PTH antagonist drug cinacalcet. Read more...

What are the symptoms of parathyroid disease?

Many symptoms. Parathyroid hormone is responsible for regulating calcium level in blood. If high, it will raise calcium level in your blood causing osteoporosis, kidney stones, kidney problems, bone pain, constipation, abdominal pain, psychological problems...If low, it can cause low calcium in the blood resulting in numbness/tingling, muscle cramps, fatigue, irritability, seizures, uncontrolled movements... Read more...

What are the symptoms of parathyroid disorders?

There are several... Symptoms are related to an elevated level of parathyroid hormone, which causes a high blood calcium level. Minimal symptoms are present until the calcium level is so high as to cause kidney stones, GI "moans" (constipation, nausea, belly pain), psychic "groans" (confusion, dementia, depression, etc.), and pain in the bones, including diffuse bone pain and fractures. Read more...
Many symptoms. The list is long: bone pain, osteopenia, osteoporosis, bone fractures, osteogenesis fibrosis cystica, kidney stones, kidney failure, pancreatitis, abdominal pain, ulcers, depression, fatigue, forgetfulness, insomnia mong others. The cure is surgery, surgery, surgery! Read more...

How common is parathyroid disease in teenagers?

Rare. I'm an adult doc but i think it's pretty rare. High calcium is the first finding, but i'd look for other causes. Read more...
Not very. This is unusual but can be associated with thyroid inflammation. This gland surrounds the parathyroid glands. Read more...

What are potential side effects of parathyroid disorders?

Osteoporosis. If an adenoma on the gland develops (usually only in one of the four), there is excess absorption and mobilization of calcium, which can result in enough loss of bone to risk fragility. If there is inadequate hormone, the opposite happens and low blood calcium can result in muscle contraction issues. Read more...
Consider. Consider full evaluation as abnormal PTH can be from a parathyroid cancer. Abnormal PTH can affect calcium, phosphate, magnesium, and vitamin d levels. Read more...
Various. Kidney stones, bone thinning abdominal complaints, memory loss, fatigue are most common. Read more...
Consequences. Parathyroid hormones are responsible for regulating calcium level in blood. The most common cause of hyperparathyroidism is a growth on your parathyroid gland causing overproduction of this hormone. If high, it will raise calcium level in your blood causing osteoporosis, kidney stones, kidney problems, constipation, abdominal pain, bone pain, psychological overtone, fatigue, memory loss... Read more...

Is there any connection between diet soft drink and thyroid/parathyroid disease?

Possible. I actually did not know about this. Apparently, the low ph of the diet soda causes an iodine leaching process in the body, which then deprives the thyroid gland of adequate amounts of iodine to synthesize a comparatively adequate amount of thyroid hormone. Useful article: http://www.Sciencedirect.Com/science/article/pii/s0140673608610053. Read more...