2 doctors weighed in:
With multiple sclerosis, with the patient eventually lose the of use of his hands or legs?
2 doctors weighed in

In brief: NOT NECESSARILY
It is imperative to treat ms aggressively, but not take inappropriate risks.
The newer more potent agents here and, on the way, are not for everybody, but could be used for most. Tysabri (natalizumab) and gilenya, and soon bg-12 and lemtrada, should be used in far more patients, as would sharply decrease the risk of ultimate disability. Vit d supplements would add protection. No rationale to expect wheelchair.

In brief: NOT NECESSARILY
It is imperative to treat ms aggressively, but not take inappropriate risks.
The newer more potent agents here and, on the way, are not for everybody, but could be used for most. Tysabri (natalizumab) and gilenya, and soon bg-12 and lemtrada, should be used in far more patients, as would sharply decrease the risk of ultimate disability. Vit d supplements would add protection. No rationale to expect wheelchair.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Thank
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology
In brief: Likely
Lesions of MS are present at multiple locations in the brain and spinal cord.
Depending on the anatomic location of the lesions, a person could lose the use of hands and legs. Legs are generally affected more than arms.

In brief: Likely
Lesions of MS are present at multiple locations in the brain and spinal cord.
Depending on the anatomic location of the lesions, a person could lose the use of hands and legs. Legs are generally affected more than arms.
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Thank
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