2 doctors weighed in:
I recently had a popping sensation in my head followed by intense dizziness. What might be the cause for it?
2 doctors weighed in

Dr. Edward Smith
Neurology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Otolithic?
It seems as if an otolith, which is a calcified structure in the inner ear, may have become dislodged, causing stimulation of nerve fibers resulting in dizziness.
A single transient episode is most likely not serious but see an ENT doctor for evaluation if you are concerned, especially if you experience more episodes, loss of balance or hearing loss.

In brief: Otolithic?
It seems as if an otolith, which is a calcified structure in the inner ear, may have become dislodged, causing stimulation of nerve fibers resulting in dizziness.
A single transient episode is most likely not serious but see an ENT doctor for evaluation if you are concerned, especially if you experience more episodes, loss of balance or hearing loss.
Dr. Edward Smith
Dr. Edward Smith
Thank
Dr. Edward Smith
Neurology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Otolithic?
The noise could be from dislodgement of an otolith, a calcified part of the inner ear which when it stimulates inner ear nerves can cause vertigo.
See your ENT doctor for evaluation, even though a single episode is rarely indicative of serious disease.

In brief: Otolithic?
The noise could be from dislodgement of an otolith, a calcified part of the inner ear which when it stimulates inner ear nerves can cause vertigo.
See your ENT doctor for evaluation, even though a single episode is rarely indicative of serious disease.
Dr. Edward Smith
Dr. Edward Smith
Thank
Dr. Edward Smith
Neurology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Otolithic?
The noise could be from dislodgement of an otolith, a calcified part of the inner ear which when it stimulates inner ear nerves can cause vertigo.
See your ENT doctor for evaluation, even though a single episode is rarely indicative of serious disease.

In brief: Otolithic?
The noise could be from dislodgement of an otolith, a calcified part of the inner ear which when it stimulates inner ear nerves can cause vertigo.
See your ENT doctor for evaluation, even though a single episode is rarely indicative of serious disease.
Dr. Edward Smith
Dr. Edward Smith
Thank
Dr. Edward Smith
Neurology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Otolithic?
The noise could be from dislodgement of an otolith, a calcified part of the inner ear which when it stimulates inner ear nerves can cause vertigo.
See your ENT doctor for evaluation, even though a single episode is rarely indicative of serious disease.

In brief: Otolithic?
The noise could be from dislodgement of an otolith, a calcified part of the inner ear which when it stimulates inner ear nerves can cause vertigo.
See your ENT doctor for evaluation, even though a single episode is rarely indicative of serious disease.
Dr. Edward Smith
Dr. Edward Smith
Thank
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