Will medicaid pay for albuterol & ipratropium bromide for copd.?

Albutrol and ipratro. Yes most of the state medicaid will cover it if ordered by a physician.
In most states. Yes, these are typically covered drugs in most states for copd.

Related Questions

I use Albuterol & Ipratropium Bromide in my nebulizer and I used it this morning 1 1/2 later I started coughing awful. My inhaler stopped it. Reason?

MDIs spacer. An inhaler with a spacer device is an effective and efficient way to deliver aerosolized asthma medications. The nebulizer may be used, but sometimes the medication delivery can be sub optimal. Read more...
Cough is good. Though there is good data to suggest an inhaler used with spacer and optimal technique can be as effective as nebulized medication (in toddlers to seniors), I don't recall ever seeing it work better than a neb. Consider whether the neb "loosened up" mucus that accumulated through the night, making cough more effective; this commonly (and paradoxically) increases cough for an hour or so. Read more...

I take albuterol, also ipratropium bromide, and budosemide, I mix the albuterol and ipratropium together. Is it ok to mix the budosemide w/albuterol?

No. I would not do it, just because you don't know how you're going to react to it. Although, there are commercial preparations of longer acting albuterol (salmeterol, formoterol), mixed in with a steroid (budesonide), there is no such formulation that would include short acting albuterol. Read more...

Is it harmful to use ipratropium bromide instead of albuteral sulfate?

NO. While ipratropium is generally used for copd, and usually in combination with albuterol, albuterol is generally used in asthma. So no harm, but may not achieve the goal of therapy when used in itself in either condition. Further since it is anticholinergic, excess usage will cause its own side effects. Read more...