Related Questions

I only took desogen (ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel) for 3 months. If I am experiencing symptoms of stopping the pill, how long until they stop?

What symptoms? Only "symptom" of stopping Desogen (ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel) (http://www.Drugs.Com/desogen.Html) is ability to get pregnant which can be as immediate as next month. If you don't want to get pregnant, go back to prescribing doctor and ask for more Desogen (ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel) (if you liked it) or another option. If you're not in a mutually monogamous relationship, make him wear a condom (unless you want to get pregnant) to lower risk of stds. Read more...

On the birth control pill desogen (ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel) so what the side effects will be?

Desogen (ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel) side-effects. All regualr birth control pills have similar side-effects including nausea, vomiting, headaches, weight gain, acne, leg cramps, breast tenderness and decreased sexual drive. Most side-effects diminish over the first 2 to 3 months of use. Starting a new birth control pill may also result in some breakthrough bleeding in the first few cycles. Read more...

What are the possible side effects of the birth control pill desogen (ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel)?

The same. All hormonal contraceptives carry the same risks, primarily would be increasing slightly the risk of a blood clot in a blood vessel. These risks are higher in smokers, especially over 35yo, and those people with hereditary blood clotting abnormalities. Read more...

How long after taking desogen (ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel) is it okay to have unprotected sex?

Depends on start. Combination pills you may start the combination pill at any time. If you start within five days after the start of your period, you are protected against pregnancy right away. You will not need to use a backup method of birth control. You should also employ safe sex practices (use condoms). Read more...

What are your experiences with desogen (ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel)?

No issues. Can't recall a patient who said they had any problems with it - but every woman's response is individualized. Read more...

Switched from desogen (ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel) to generic apri. Are there any differences?

Yes. Generic versions of medications are usually fine, but they are not identical. The fda allows for a modest degree of difference in "bioequivalence". Essentially, a generic medication is allowed to be sold if it is between 80% - 125% of the brand name medication. Most generic medications are fine for most people, but there is always some percentage of patients for whom they are different. Read more...