What does the process of "remineralization" of tooth enamel consist of?

Replacing minerals. When acid and bacteria react to form an acid, the acid will leach minerls out of the tooth structure. Remineralizaion is the replacing of the lost minerals with menerals found in your saliva.
Tooth Hardening Meds. There are a number of remineralizing agents. Basically, the bacteria on teeth eat the food you eat and their waste products are acids which pull the calcium and phosphorous out of the tooth surface. Fluoride makes the surface less acid soluble and inhibits bacterial attachment to the surface. There are super-saturated forms of calcium that can replace the calcium lost when applied to teeth.
Tooth Hardening Meds. There are a number of ermine realizing agents. Basically, the bacteria on teeth eat the food you eat and their waste products are acids which pull the calcium and phosphorous out of the tooth surface. Fluoride makes the surface less acid soluble and inhibits bacterial attachment to the surface. There are super-saturated forms of calcium that can replace the calcium lost when applied to teeth.

Related Questions

What does the process of "remineralization" of tooth enamel consist of?

Rebuilding. Demineralization is when a tooth has lost its minerals (calcium, phosphorus) and is weakened. Remineralization is when it gains it back and is restrengthened. The enamel can also trade a Fluoride atom for an oh- molecule and become even stronger than it was before. Thats why they put Fluoride in the water and in toothpaste -- sometimes a dentist may also refer to this as remineralization. Read more...
Saliva is Good! Tooth enamel is constantly being depleted by minerals when you eat acid, and minerals are constantly being deposited by saliva. When a tooth has a weak spot, adding more minerals and creating less acid will slant the process towards more minerals into the enamel; thus 'remineralization' it takes a special kind of calcium plus, usually, Fluoride to make this happen. Ask your dentist. Read more...

What exactly does the process of "remineralization" of tooth enamel consist of?

Chemical change. Natural enamel is made up of hydroxyapetite and when it demineralizes (from sugar/acid) the hydroxide leaves and weakens/softens the struture of the tooth. Fluoride is the replacement that comes in and replaces the hydroxide and you get fluorapetite which is more compact and harder. You are not growing enamel, just hardening it back up. Read more...
Rebuilding. Enamel is made up of complex crystals of calcuim phosphate and organic material. These crystals lose calcium etc as theydemineralize. If the damage isn't too extensive calcuim and phosphate from the saliva is taken and the crystal structure remineralized/repaired. Fluiride, if available, can also be incorporated in this structure making the crystal more resistant to acid attack. Read more...