Who gets ear infections?

Various. Various types of people can get ear infections for various reasons. One common type is called otitis media, the type of ear infection that children often get, needing antibiotics and sometimes surgical tube placement. Another common type is acute otitis externa, aka swimmer's ear. Children and adults can get this, often but not always related to water exposure.
Frequent sinus/cold. People who get frequent cold or sinus infection, post nasal drip, young children, people with tonsils or adenoid issues can get frequent ear problems. In adults it is seen with impacted wax can get infection with the same.

Related Questions

Please explain what gets rid of ear infection?

Infections. Ear infections are caused by a few things: 1) viruses-which are treatable with time and symptom relief such as decongestants or ibuprofen/acetaminophen, 2) bacteria-which are treated with antibiotics, and 3) fungal-which are treated with anti fungal agents. Read more...

If the inside of my baby’s ear looks swollen and red, does she have an ear infection?

Infection. The baby can have an external ear infection, call your doctor and discuss possible treatment. Read more...
You can't really... ...See the eardrum from the outside; an ear infection you can see is likely to be otitis externa (sometimes called 'swimmer's ear'). Read more...
Not typical. That description is not a normal finding on a child. It could be due to several reasons so it is best to have MD examine it. If there is pain, fever or discharge see MD asao. Read more...

My 3 year old daughter gets ear infection frequently. What can I do to improve her immunity?

There are options. A lot of this answer depends on how frequent "frequently" is, and the type and degree of infection. Assuming this is middle ear infection (otitis media), up to a couple of infections a year is not uncommon and probably does not warrant further therapy except acute treatment. More than 3 in 6 months may warrant tympanostomy tubes. Adequate rest is the most important modifiable factor for immunity. Read more...
Antibiotics/tubes. 5-6 infections in a single year is an absolute indication for tympanostomy tubes to prevent hearing loss (associated with acute infection/chronic fluid). If she is having 2-3/year for the past several years, it is also reasonable to consider tubes. Further, if she has a documented "chronic infection" or fluid with hearing loss for 3 months, she should be evaluated for tubes by your local ent. Read more...
See below. For children experiencing frequent ear infections, avoidance of exposure to tobacco smoke, adequate immunizations against pneumococcus and influenza, and utilizing small sized babycare setting instead of large daycare would be advised. Tympanostomy tube insertion should also be considered if middle ear effusion persists between bouts of infections. Read more...

Husband gets severe ear infection every 3 months in same ear. So severe his ear swells shut and causes him a lot of pain. What could be causing this?

Otitis externa. The fact that you tell me that his ear swells up makes me think this is an external canal infection, as opposed to a middle ear infection. This is caused by bacteria invading the external ear canal ( like a swimmers ear). He can try putting white vinegar in his ear once to twice daily for prevention of these infections. Read more...
Recurrent otitis. I would want to make sure he isn't diabetic which suppresses immune function and that he is completely well to avoid recurrence. Treatment with acetic acid vosol (acetic acid and propylene glycol) afterwards might help prevent recurrence. Has he seen an ENT specialist? Read more...

Should I take my child out of day care if he gets recurring ear infections?

Tough. That's really a hard call... If you need the daycare, there may be no way around it. However, the recurrent ear infections could be treated with tubes. This will not prevent the stuffy and runny (the viral infection) but it can help with the pain and complications associated with ear infections (hearing loss), . Read more...
No, but see an ENT. If your kid is getting recurrent ear infections, the best thing to do is to bring him to an ENT doctor for evaluation. He may need ear tubes temporarily placed until he grows out of the problem. Other that leading to complications of infections, fluid behind the eardrum also effects hearing and language development. Ear tubes can prevent language development problems. Read more...
personal decision. Taking them out of childcare may reduce the number of infections. Another alternative is to switch to a smaller daycare (less than 5 children) or to get ear tubes. Also, most children tend to stop getting sick as frequently after about a year in daycare. Read more...

I took my 3 year old grandson to Dr this am & he has an ear infection? First time, how could this happen? I bought the antibiotic. He never gets ill?

Your grandson. is blessed if this is his first ear infection & he doesn't normally get ill. Bottom line, is that the world is filled with microbes. Also, a child has a short eustachian tube so getting an infection is pretty easy. Read more...
1st time 4 everythin. Hi. Your grandson has an ear infection. He never gets ill? 3 years is not a long life yet, and he just did get ill. Don't let this get you down. Kid'll do fine. Read more...
They all get them. My expectation is that all kids have at least one middle ear infection, usually before age 2. The relatively small head, small drainage tube from ear to throat, frequent exposure to cold viruses or airway irritants increase age adjusted risk. As the head grows & structures drain better, the tendency decreases. Read more...

Signs of an ear infection?

Ear pain, redness. While ear infections can have many signs and symptoms, a few suggest the need to be examined by a health professional. Ear infections can be on the outside including the ear and canal, and some in the middle ear. Drainage of pus or blood is a clear sign of a problem. Pain, swelling and redness are also concerning. If you feel sick, or have a fever it suggests a possible systemic infection. Read more...
Ear Infection Signs. Ear infection symptoms include pain, hearing loss, and fever. Usually, these symptoms follow an upper respiratory infection, especially the common cold, in young children. Adults experience ear infections infrequently, but often may have ear pain. Read more...